Kinetic Energy and Kelvin

Someone help me out here. I think the following is true:

A chunk of mass at 0 Kelvin as no energy.
Kinetic energy is a type of energy.
An object in motion contains kinetic energy.

Therefore an object in motion cannot measure 0 K? Is that right? If someone grabs a chunk of mass at 0K and hurls it at 500kph, it will no longer be 0K? I’ve always thought of it as none of the atoms are moving around, so it’s at 0K. But if the whole object was moving, then all the atoms are moving. They’re just not vibrating or moving in relation to each other. But they are moving relative to other objects in space.

What is the lowest possible temperature in Kelvin an object can be at if traveling 1/3 C?

You’re referring to thermodynamic temperature, which comprises random relative motion of atoms and its associated potential “spring” energy if the atoms are bound to one another or trapped in molecules in a solid.

If all the atoms are moving together relative to some distant object, but have no motion relative to each other, it can be moving fast and be at 0 kelvins.

Awesome. Thanks.

Keep in mind, also, all things are constantly moving, motion is only dectable if compared to a reference point, and there are many forms of energy.

A chunk of mass at 0 Kelvin as no energy.
Kinetic energy is a type of energy.
An object in motion contains kinetic energy.*

No kinetic energy. It does, however, have potential energy IIRC.