Oven Cleaner and Pregnancy

Mrs Zeke and I are currently growing a sprog, she moreso than I. Thanks all for the congrats in advance :smiley:

This evening, out of the blue, Mrs. Zeke announced that she wished oven-cleaners gave a list of specific warnings. I asked her to elaborate,

"Well, it says to use it in a well ventilated space, to use gloves and to avoid inhaling the fumes but it doesn’t say, don’t use this if you’re pregnant - so it should theoretically be safe?

I didn’t know for sure but my immediate reaction was, no it’s not safe. I then told her to name a day and find somewhere else to be for five or so hours and I’d clean the oven and air out the house (in Manitoba in December :)).

For curiosity sake I hit the internet.

Google produced a hit from an NHS hospitalbut it basically said, “we don’t know what cleaners will do but wear gloves and don’t inhale”. That was as helpful as the label.

So I come here to ask; are there are known (or even prettly likely) potential effects on the foetus if the mother inhales an oven-cleaning’s worth of fumes?

From ‘Wired’:
What’s Inside: Foamalicious, Vaporlicious Easy-Off Oven Cleaner
Wired isn’t the goto place for chemical info, but AFAIK, they don’t often suffer from the screaming heebee jeebees about such things either:

Confirmation of diethanolamine content.

Why not clean the oven for her when she’s out of the house?

Check to see if you have a self-cleaning oven. If you do, the process consists of the oven heating up to around 700-900 degrees and literally reducing any food particles into ash. The oven will stay locked until cool and then you can wipe the ash away with a damp cloth. Hope this helps.

Squink said, “…Why not clean the oven for her when she’s out of the house?”
Zeke replies, “I thought I said something implying that in the OP. Oh yeah, here it is, ‘I then told her to name a day and find somewhere else to be for five or so hours and I’d clean the oven and air out the house.’”

Medstar - No, sadly we lack a self-cleaning oven and so I shall soon find myself elbow deep in carbon and chemical sludge.

At least in the US, many warning labels are CMA tactics that legal departments insist on because the manufacturers have not tested on pregnant women.

Corporate attorney: Did you guys do a statistically valid study on the effects of this product on pregnant women and their unborn children?

Engineer (flipping through documentation): No, we never got around to that.

Corporate attorney: Make sure you guys warn pregnant women to stay away from this stuff, since if a pregnant woman or her child gets harmed and it is alleged that our product caused it, and we get sued, we are done for.