Pitting UltraVires

My beloved alma mater. Ann Arbor is one of the best things about Michigan. It’s where we kids used to flee to escape the bigoted small towns we grew up in. Hope you get a chance to see it someday.

I was there for Fall 20/Winter 21 semesters. I’m currently working at one of the legal clinics, but remote from Texas because I prefer heat in the day time to a chill at night.

But rest assured, I have seen Ann Arbor.

I’m going to buy a tub of Cool Whip and eat it straight out of the tub just to spite all you haters.

For added spite, be sure to pronounce it “Cool Hwip”.

Really? I’ve always pronounced it “coo-ip.”

I’ll have to think Stewie Griffin.

Hwill Hweaton likes to eat it straight out of the tub.

I eat it straight out of the tub while IN the tub, watching Telly-Tubbies.

Eating too much of it will make you tubby.

Will Wheaton aside, I came to terms with the fact that, generally speaking, English language words beginning with “Wh-” are correctly pronounced as though they begin with “Hw-” nearly sixty years ago.

I simply don’t get why Seth MacFarlane (or anyone else) seems to have an issue with it.

Not totally getting what you’re saying. In my experience, words that start with ‘wh’ are almost always pronounced, in modern American English at least, as if they simply started with a ‘w.’ ‘Witch’ and ‘which’ are homophones. The ‘hw’ pronunciation feels very old-timey. I imagine that’s what MacFarlane (and others) are making fun of. Perhaps your mileage varies on this one?

I believe the appropriate answer is “lighten up Francis”

It’s a joke. MacFarlane is paid to be funny, not seriously take up issues.

  1. Part of the joke is that Stewie doesn’t pronounce most “wh” words as “hw”. And “Will” isn’t even a “wh” word. It’s a significant part of the bit that he pronounces “will” in isolation as “wil” and “wheat” in isolation as “weet”, but he pronounces “Will Wheaton” as “hwil hweeton”.

  2. A big part of the joke is that Stewie is an infant who should be pre-verbal yet speaks in an affected, and comically exaggerated, pseudo-British “Atlantic accent”, which is mostly extinct in the real world.

  3. Finally, the fact that other people talk differently has been a prime source of humor pretty much literally since the beginning of recorded history.

N.B.: I personally found the bit moderately amusing the first time. But the humor for me was much more Stewie’s personal idiosyncrasies and his interaction with Brian, than any humor inherent in dialectical differences.

I once watched a Family Guy episode on DVD where Seth McFarlane said on the commentary track that he based Stewie’s voice and accent on a portrayal of Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady. (I can’t remember if he said which actor and if it was a stage performance or otherwise.)

He said it was Rex Harrison.

In today’s edition of “Posts I drafted in ATMB but decided was too spicy”:

If you think asking someone making the claim that A leads to B whether we actually see B more frequently when A is true is unreasonable, I really don’t know what your standard of proof is. Whether you already agree with the statement being made or not? Whether you like the guy or not? Whether it’s a Wednesday after tea time? No wonder you buy into so much conservative nonsense.

Here’s my experience with UV from the Juneteenth thread.
UV: I’m going to put all y’all on blast for picking a made-up date to celebrate the end of slavery. You should use MY date.
Me: Yours is a made-up date too. The real date is XXXX.
UV: My made-up date is better than the real date because reasons.