Presidents and their opposition

Not that I expect it to happen with Dubya, but did any newly elected president ever choose his opposition in the election as a member of his cabinet, or an advisor, or anything like that?

When Rutherford Hayes became president in 1877, the Republicans agreed to give the Democrats a Cabinet post as a consolation prize. David(?) Key was named Postmaster General to assuage the Democrats. The more important concession was the end of Reconstruction and the restoration of Democrat governments in the Southern States.

Well, Franklin Roosevelt liked his 1940 Republican opponent Wendell Willkie. He kept Willkie around as a consultant, and appointed him as a special ambassador to China and the Soviet Union during the Second WOrld War.

After the Kennedy-Johnson ticket defeated the Republican ticket of Richard Nixon and Henry Cabot Lodge, I believe John Kennedy appointed Lodge as ambassador to Viet Nam (some reward, huh?).

As reported on the front page of the Washington Post this morning, Bush has met with Democratic Senator John Breaux as a potential candidate for Secretary of Energy.

Not exactly his opposition in this case - I meant has the winner of an election ever chosen the loser (pres or vp candidate) for a position?

Not unless you want to count 1796, when the case was still that the second place candidate was named vice president. Four years of John Adams as President and Thomas Jefferson as Vice President was not exactly conducive to good government.

Gee, that sure is nice of old Dubya, considering Democrats would be crazy to give up the 50-50 split in the Senate…

I heard on CNN this morning that Breaux “suggested” a Democratic ex-Senator from his state of Louisiana. Not that it really matters that he’s a Democrat, any Senator from Louisiana is presumably safely in the pocket of the oil companies…

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*Originally posted by fiddlesticks *
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Breaux has said he’s not interested…but ya never know…

I’m from Louisiana and I would be most pissed if Breaux took the job. He’s much more powerful as a conservative southern swing voter. The sweet smell of federal pork will be commin’ my way.

Not from the opposing parties, but most of Lincoln’s cabinet was composed of men who had challenged him for the Republican presidential candidacy in 1860.