Running Photoshop CS3 on Windows XP on an iMac w/Boot Camp

We’ve been getting this problem with weird artifacting displaying whenever you mess with any of the selection tools. It’s only in photoshop and it doesn’t impact the final product but makes it difficult to work.

Anyone run across this problem before?
Here is a sample. For some reason I can screenshot the problem.
http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/8161/photoshopartifacting.jpg

That looks like a bad video driver. Make sure yours is up to date (the video card in the iMacs varies based on model and release year). If it’s been a long time since you installed Bootcamp, check at Apple’s site, too, to see if there is a drivers update.

The other possibility is a bad video card, but that seems unlikely if you only see it in one app.

I appreciate your answer, and sorry for taking a week to respond, but do you know anything about the color profiles? She has a Canon Inkjet that she wants me to color match it to. Normally for something that simple in the kind of op that we’re running, I’d just adjust the monitor, but Macs with their damned seemless design don’t have brightness and contrast and such on the monitor.

If it’s a Video card problem, maybe they just don’t have the right drivers for XP at this point.

So what is your final product, electronic or print? Have you run any video calibration yet? And why aren’t you using Photoshop CS3 for a Mac. It just seems to me that running a graphics XP app via XP via an IMac with boot camp is more of an intellectual pursuit than doing it correctly with the proper app on the proper O/S.

Most drivers I’ve seen will let you change those options in the Advanced settings in Display control panel. Photoshop CS2 also came with software that will help; it would surprise me if it didn’t also come with CS3.

It’s a legacy thing. No video calibration yet, that’s what I’m asking about.

What is the name of utility? Where is it located?

Color management in Photoshop works as follows:

  1. Make sure your monitor is calibrated using a hardware-based monitor profiling system like X-Rite’s i1, Huey Pro, etc.

  2. Download the ICC profiles for the paper you are using

  3. When you print in Photoshop, in the print preview screen, there’s a section that says “Color Handling.” You set that to “Photoshop Manages Color.” Below that you have “Printer Profile.” This is where you select the ICC profile for the paper that you are printing.

  4. Hit OK/Print whatever it is to get you to the next screen, your printer’s driver.

  5. Select the correct media in the Canon print driver. I’m not familiar with Canon’s drivers, but somewhere there should be a section to turn off the printer’s color management. You want to turn off Canon’s color management, since you want Photoshop to color manage your document.

  6. Print

So, to recap:

  1. Calibrate monitor
  2. Software -> Turn color management on. Choose correct printer paper profile.
  3. Printer -> Turn color management off. Choose correct print media settings.