Sexists and Hats

My Theatre teacher was waxing philosophical today and he posed a question to us:

Why do women get to keep their hats on while indoors while men are expected to remove them?

Men don’t pin theirs on. It’s more of a pain for women to take theirs off. Plus, hat hair.

I think Ethilrist pretty much hit two of the three major reasons.

The other factor is that a woman’s hat, at least in Western society, was in the last century and a half more apt to be an integral part of the lady’s outfit. A gentleman’s hat was more of just a hat.

Most hat websites out there agree with Ethilrist.

Here’s an example:

from villiagehatshop.com

Let us know what your theater teacher says once you set him straight, okay?

Not something to do with this:

is it?

(Quoted severely out of context, but then when (and if) people formulate bizarre customs on Biblical passages, that is sometimes par for the course.)

I was once told that Jewish men are expected to cover their pates in temple, but not women. In Catholic churches, I was told, men are expected to remove their hats and women are to cover their heads (a scarf or a piece of lace will do.)

I’m neither a Jew nor a Catholic, by the way. I’m a recovering Presbyterian, and maybe a Taoist. I’m a tweener.

“Sexists and Hats”

Band name!

In practice it has nothing to do directly with sexism and everything to do with the fact that a man’s hat is, or at least was, a last-minute accessory added as he was walking out the door, whereas a woman’s hat is/was a carefully selected part of the outfit intended to be worn all day and carefully placed on the head and anchored to the hairdo with long, deadly pins.

Re: the Corinthians quote, there are many religions that abide by the rule that women should have their heads covered…and I’m pretty sure it didn’t start in the New Testament, because I’ve a friend who is Jewish and who wears a wig so that no one but her husband can see her hair. She says this is a Jewish custom, but I’m not sure if she’s Orthodox or Reformed or what. A Pentacostal friend of mine wears a lace bit pinned to her hair specifically because St. Paul said a woman’s head should be covered when she prays; and as she says, “I have four children, two with special needs. I don’t have time to find my hat.”

I was made to remove hats in one particular class in highschool… even though they were “lady’s” hats and not baseball caps. The teacher’s reasoning was that if the boys had to do it, so did the girls. So hey, equality is out there…

This brings up a question: I thought Victrorian ettiquette dictated that a lady not wear a hat indoors (especially in evening.) As I understood, if a “call” was the standard fifteen minutes, it was not necessary to remove one’s hat, but if a lady intended to stay longer (such as a paty), she should remove it. I don’t think this applied to church, but I thought it was impolite to wear a hat in an informal setting. Anyone know?

I know in colonial times that a woman had to wear a hat at all times, even if it was only a pinner (a piece of lace about the size of a doily that was pinned onto a woman’s hair).

I know in colonial times that a woman had to wear a hat at all times, even if it was only a pinner (a piece of lace about the size of a doily that was pinned onto a woman’s hair).