Term for holders of bachelor's degrees

Everyone knows that those with a Ph.D. (and a few other degrees) are known as Doctor LastName. Some know that those with a master’s degree are known as Magister LastName. What’s the term of address for someone with a bachelor’s degree?

“Cleanup on aisle three”?

-FrL-

Mr/Mrs/Ms/Miss X. In English there is no special term of address for the holder of a bacherlor’s debgee, but degree abbreviations can be used as post-nominals (eg Jane Doe, BA) In Spanish speaking countries the holder of a “'licenciatura” can be address as *Licenciado/Licenciada X

I move that we adopt the honorific Baccalaureate for this purpose. Mostly because it would be really cool to hear someone called “Baccalaureate Bob”.

A B.S. degree is nothing in academic circles.
A masters degree is just a small step up.
I worked in an environment overloaded with holders of PhD’s. Some of the wive asked nay insisted that they be addressed as Mrs. Dr. PiledHigerandDeeper!
They all put their pants on one leg at a time unless they are voluntee firemem.
So maybe I’m a wee bit prejudiced/unimpressed. :wink:
It’s performance that counts not the sheepskin.

[QUOTE=spingears… Some of the wive asked nay insisted that they be addressed as Mrs. Dr. PiledHigerandDeeper!..[/QUOTE]

That used to be common in Germany. The wife of Herr Doktor would be Frau Doktor, that same was not true for the husband of a real Frau Doktor.

According to my Weekly World News that I picked up with the guac and beer tonight, a Caribbean college is rescinding all bachelor’s degrees granted to students who later become married.

Best of all is this last sentence: “We will also not award any further master’s degrees to submissives.”

Well yes I understand that it’s nothing, and that it doesn’t matter to me (Dr. Mathochist). Still, I’m wondering about the analogous term and that’s part of fighting ignorance, innit?

Us technologists don’t get anything like that, even though we have a professional association and everything! No P.Tech. for us! Just because we only have three-year diplomas instead of four-year degrees…

Mathochist writes:

> Some know that those with a master’s degree are known as Magister
> LastName.

Where have you ever heard anyone refer to a holder of a master’s degree as Magister Whatever? I’ve spent my entire adult life around holders of advanced degrees and I’ve never heard of such a thing. Even if you can find some bizarre book of etiquette that claims that the term “Magister” is used this way (and I’ve never seen such a book), where have you ever actually heard anyone use this term?

Heh. Wikipedia:
"Magister may refer to:

* Master's degree, an academic degree
* The Fouga Magister, a French training aircraft
* The Miles Magister, a British training aircraft
* A Magister equitum, or Master of the Horse
* A Magister militum, a Master of the Soldiers
* The Magister Armhook Squid
* Croatian knowledge database (in Croatian wikipedia)"

“You THOUGHT I was saying you had a master’s, but to the contrary, this whole time I had believed you a squid…”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master’s_degree makes no use of the term in English, only in Latin and other languages. Google ‘magister degree’ or ‘magister of’, and you find lots of European universities.

Mine’s definitely ‘Master’, because it says so on the certificate :stuck_out_tongue: I’m with Wendell Wagner, that it’s a bizarre term which nobody ever uses in real life. And with alphaboi867, that it’s just ‘Mr/Mrs/Miss’.

I prefer to consider myself a Mistress of the Arts. :wink:

When’s the last time you heard anyone refer to a young man (under 18) as “master” since he hasn’t yet become “mister”?

Look, we talk about all sorts of random trivial things around here. It’s obsolete, yes, but that doesn’t make it wrong. Now kindly stow the attitude.

You’re under 18?

It’s a foot in the door. I have a BA in Radio/TV broadcasting, and it got me in the door. You know the basics, you know which end of the camera is up, you know the terminology.

After that, it’s what you learn on the job.

Didn’t some women’s colleges in the 19th century grant that as an actual degree?

Mathochist writes:

> When’s the last time you heard anyone refer to a young man (under 18)
> as “master” since he hasn’t yet become “mister”?

That I’ve heard of, although it’s rather old-fashioned. It was mostly just in print though. You might address a letter formally to Master John Smith. Calling a young boy Master John Smith is even more old-fashioned. That has nothing to do with the claim that you’re making in the OP.

> Look, we talk about all sorts of random trivial things around here. It’s obsolete,
> yes, but that doesn’t make it wrong. Now kindly stow the attitude.

The point is that I’ve never heard “Magister” used in English as a title for a holder of a master’s degree. Given that I’ve spent the past thirty-five or so years among people with graduate degrees, if this tradition existed, you’d think I would have heard of it. Give us a cite that such a tradition exists.

So it would appear: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~maury/columcon.htm

I don’t know if this is relavant, but, as with the doctors who would be a danger practicing medicine, append their names with PhD, so an under graduate may do the same with BA or BS, depending on the area of their bachelor’s degree. A person holding a bachelor’s in business would be a BBA, a nurse is Ms Nurse RN, BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing).