The Dogs of War

I just read a short article about the dogs thatwere used in the raid on bin Laden’s compound:

http://www.thedaily.com/page/2011/05/05/050511-news-seal-dog-1-5/

Im the article, it says that the dog’s handler’s keep the dog after discharge. In the past, military dogs were treated as excess weaponry, and at the end of their ‘stint’ were either euthanized or simply abandoned like any other weapon left behind. I certainly HOPE things have changed for these dogs who fight bravely beside their handlers but have no information.

Do any of you know- what *does *happen to the dogs of war? Do they get a happy-ever-after or are they cast aside to fend for themselves or condemed to death?

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogs_in_warfare (in paragraph “Modern uses”)

This site http://www.militaryworkingdogadoptions.com/ says that the law in question was HR 5314, passed on November 6, 2000.

The text says

Here is the pdf link for HR 5314: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-106hr5314eh/pdf/BILLS-106hr5314eh.pdf

I can only speculate that dogs deemed unsuitable for adoption are still euthanised.

Do you have a cite for this? What does “abandoned” mean? I have a hard time believing they were just let out of their cages and allowed to roam around the military base free to start up wild dog packs.

From here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_dog

Is this passage:

It cites a CNN Special Report as a source: http://articles.cnn.com/2010-02-12/living/war.dogs_1_dogs-lab-and-shepherd-mix-viet-cong?_s=PM:LIVING

There was a heartwarming story in the New York Times a years or so ago about the bomb-sniffing dog at the Montana state capitol, which was bought surplus from the IDF (and who only answered to Hebrew commands, so his handler had to get pronunciation tips from one of the three rabbis in Montana). So apparently there do exist some lower-intensity jobs for old war-zone dogs.

Heartwarming story here: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/05/us/05religion.html

Thank you for posting that site- I just remember seeing a show on Discovery about '98-'99 about this. It was a very sad situation. They interviewed some of the handlers that had to leave their dogs behind, and even after all those years, there were still tears.

Most veteran dogs are in great demand in retirement, by their trainers, formers trainers, and (former) trainers’ family, friends, and co-workers.

The dogs are retired fairly young, healthy, and well-trained to obey commands. Most are suitable for civilian retirment (pets), particularly the scenting dogs, who are not selected for aggression.

There are dogs that are deemed unsuitable for civilian life. I have met military dogs that I would agree would be unsuitable. Should they be farmed out as junk-yard dogs?

From a well-place source: the dog’s name is Semper Fido.

Just came in here to cry a little havoc, that’s all.

That’s from the fifth Hank, right? As an interesting note…too lazy to look up cite…“crying havoc” means that all normal rules of warfare (including killing only armed combatants) were off the table. It is the threat–or practice-- of raping, looting, and all the rest.
ETA: Not really too lazy, but typing w one thumb on iPad. I’ve got some neuro issues.

Nope, JC.

Not merely a suspension of the rules, it was a specific command to the soldiers to cause havoc by pillaging and looting. (And all the rest.)