Vaporizer pens. What do we know about them and their affect on the lungs?

Can someone point me in the direction of any studies about folks using these pens. My son and his girlfriend use them and I’d like to talk to them about it.

Thank you.

Are you talking about electronic cigarettes? I’ve never heard of a “vaporizor pen”.

Good luck with that. There has been very little research done.

And the information out there is very biased pro and con. So getting a feeling for harmful or unharmful they really are is really difficult.

I will say this: If they are doing these “pens” (They’re called Ecigs BTW) instead of real cigarettes, count your lucky stars.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/281396232151?lpid=82

Here’s a link to what I mean. The ones they use are a little fancier, but this is the gist.

Okay, same thing.

Uh, you sure? I don’t use either, but as far as I know, e-cigs are a tobacco replacement, while vape pens are a means of consuming marijuana.

Vapes are a better option than smoking. The one thing they do is remove all the chemicals you potentially could be sucking down.

I have seen a few medical statements that say vapes are a better option than cigs, but it is better not to get the nicotine addiction in the first place

In that case, the OP needs to clarify. I had no idea.

In any case, those devices shown in the link can be used to inhale ecig liquid.

Seems that “butane hash oil” or “wax” is a thing.

Now I’m wondering if the OP has a more complicated problem on his hands than he thought :).

Ok the liquid is a mixture of propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin, along with various food flavoring and colors(there is plain one available) and finally nicotine(you can get it without the nicotine though). Everything but the nicotine is food or pharmaceutical grade and considered safe for consumption.

When you press the button on the battery a heating element in the unit heats up a wick soaked in the liquid, which causes it to vaporize and then you inhale the vapor which delivers nicotine to your body. I have seen it said it is water vapor, and it appears to be as it doesn’t have the viscosity of the PG/VG when it condenses, but who knows.

It is much healthier than smoking tobacco, but as for whether some obscure health issue will appear decades from now no one can say but it is doubtful. But this applies to everything in life pretty much. Smoking tobacco has major known health risks, it is definitely bad for you. So if you replace smoking with vaping it is a net win, but it would be silly to take up vaping for fun.

EDIT:An obviously biased source:

http://vapersclub.com/pg.php

Also you know fog machines in night clubs? Most use PG.

When I read the OP, I thought his kids were sniffing those magic markers:)

http://crafts.creativebug.com/dangers-use-permanent-markers-1065.html

So apparently it turned out to be not what you’d expected. :wink:

They use them to inhale flavored oils. They said the oils contain a small amount of nicotine.

I really don’t know how they are different from e-cigs, if they are. But he has never been a cigarette smoker.

So, it looks like there isn’t much research on them. Well, thanks guys. Hopefully, they won’t hurt them.

I’m pretty sure vape pens deliver more than nicotine as High Times advertise them in connection with marijuana. Itt also states on that page that the American Lung Association is trying to have them banned, which seems a tad premature to me.

I don’t disagree with anything you’ve written above - but just to add that there seems to be a prevailing assumption that ‘safe for consumption’ means the same as ‘safe for inhalation in vapour form’ - Consumption and inhalation aren’t the same thing though - for example, many vegetable oils are perfectly safe for consumption, but if you get them in your lungs, they can really screw you up.
Of course, I’m not trying to compare apples and oranges here - just wishing that the very widespread assurances of safety regarding vaping were based on evidence, rather than assumption.

The page I linked to contains excerpts from people like the EPA on inhaled PG, all say non-toxic and non-carcinogenic. There are no studies on people who have spent twenty years inhaling it, so the point there is the I dunno.

Here is an issue I have personally, many claim the vaporizers produce “water vapor” and indeed it does appear to be water, when it condenses it feels like water, not PG/VG. But this doesn’t really make sense to me for some reason, heat PG/VG and get water?:dubious: YET the studies say PG vapor can be used to sterilize air, like in a hospital.

http://www.candyflavor.com/PG_Based_Candy_Flavor.html

I think this is the sort of thing. I took one small hit from the one he offered, I think it was raspberry. I didn’t get high from it, but I probably wouldn’t have from the small amount I tried.

PG is not only in the products you apply to yourself such as shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant, lotions, etc. Many of the processed foods you buy in the grocery store contain PG to aid in processing and to maintain moisture. PG is fed to livestock – you can buy it by the gallon or by the barrel at your local farm store. PG is all around you.

As for vapor – PG has been used in inhaled medicines for over 60 years. People with asthma, COPD, and other breathing difficulties have been breathing in PG to make them better.

And if you run into the “PG is antifreeze” scare tactic, know that PG has indeed been used as an ingredient in certain types of antifreeze in situations such as marine engines where it is important that leaks are non-toxic.

It’s potentially possible, but I don’t know the chemical formula for either PG or VG, nor do I remember how to work out the chemical equation for their interactions in heat. I remembered only enough Chemistry to pass the class, and then promptly forgot the details.

But I do know that many things give off water as they combust - wood being one of them. Some of the hydrogens and some of the oxygens in the fuel and the air are released and combine to make water molecules as a byproduct of all the other chemical interactions.

I’m with you - no idea if the “water vapor” is actually water vapor, but it’s not impossible. Easy enough to test for if one had a high school chem lab…

These points not in dispute.

OK, now that does sound like reason to relax a little about potential risks.