What makes one diamond ring worth 300 times as much as another?

So I’m doing research on diamond rings and some rings go for around $200; some go for around $4,000 to $6,000 or even more. I’m at the most novice of novice laymen at this, so other than simply the cartel-factor at work - and sellers trying to dupe rich but gullible men into buying - just what makes one ring worth 300 times as much as the other? Because from examination, they seem to have roughly the same diamond content, gold content, and maybe just simply a bit more craftsmanship…but that’s all.

Is it just brand label power - like how a leather handbag that has Versace or Gucci on it can sell for a hundred times more than one that doesn’t?

Cut
Clarity
Color
Carat

What makes the difference is all four of those factors combined. Plus marketing.

Your $200 ricg is going to be small, off-color, flawed, badly-cut and poorly mounted. Your $6000 ring is going to be well over a carat, brilliantly cut, flawless, and not pink.

The Master speaks on the topic.

Ah thanks. Also, too late to edit: My math was off and it was 30x as more expensive, not 300x - but then again, I’m sure there are $60,000 diamond rings out there in the world aplenty, too.

Mariah Carey’s engagement ring from James Packer cost approximately $10M and they didn’t even end up getting married. :slight_smile:

A guy I know bought a pretty good-sized diamond for his wife. She took it to a different jeweler to have it appraised, and it turned out to be a cheap rock with cracks in it. The first jeweler had treated it with some sort of epoxy to fill the cracks and even out the color.

One big rock is worth far more than a bunch of smaller rocks that add up to the same weight, because larger diamonds are far more rare - a 1 carat princess cut with excellent characteristics would be valued around $15k, while 4 1/4 carat diamonds with the exact same characteristics would be worth 2 grand. Switch it to round cuts and 1/8 carat diamonds, and the difference becomes $20k to $1400. Same total weight, but the usual single LARGE diamond is where most of the cost will originate, even if there is equal or greater weight in accents.

Actually, I thought pink was good? And the OP might want to read this recent article on how to shop for diamonds. Apparently each has a unique GIA ID number and the same diamond might be listed at several sites for different prices.

Not as good as colorless. I would have put “brown” but the marketing ploy of “chocolate diamonds” has made formerly just used as industrial diamonds into fancy jewelry.

I’m going with ‘marketing’.

If it’s all just “marketing”, do you think it’s also just marketing that this car is worth more than this car?

I like the chocolate diamonds. Just saying. In case Santa Baby is listening.:slight_smile:

Of course not…but a flawless, white diamond is not functionally better than a diamond of the same size with an occlusion and a yellowish tone.

Because De Beers says so. Ironically your $200 diamond may have a higher resale value than a $6000 one because it’s in higher demand. And even then, it will still a be worth a fraction of what you paid for it on the resale market.

As for larger diamonds costing more because they’re rarer…kind of. There’s fewer really large diamonds, but diamonds aren’t rare. https://www.gemsociety.org/article/are-diamonds-really-rare/

I’ve always got a chuckle out of the idea that diamonds are “rare”, when there are display shelves full of them for sale in every jewelry store/department store/big box store/pawnshop/etc. in the US.

I couldn’t remember the name of the show when I posted about it in another thread, but watch a few episodes of Gem HunT https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=gem+hunt and you’ll get an idea of how ridiculously overpriced retail gem and precious stones are.

Yes, it’s reality TV and everything, especially the retail prices are exaggerated, but listen between the lines to get an idea of much of a profit the retailer makes. I know people who go on a shopping spree when Sears or a jewelry store offers 80% off retail pricing. Ummm…gems and precious stones have no best by date, just a ‘best buy, now!’ date. Yes, I know the retail price is way overstated, but someone way more and way too much when the sale isn’t in effect.

The catch is that you know someone, who knows someone, who knows someone, there’s no way you’re going to pay anywhere near what the store really paid, much less what it’s really worth, probably 90% or less of retail. IMHO, the real worth of diamonds not used for industrial purposes = ZERO"

There’s some gold, too.

:confused: 15+ posts and nobody says mazel tov? You folks are ruthlessly single-minded ignorance-fighters! :slight_smile: Anyway Velocity, if your research is for the obvious (?) purpose then congratulations!

Thanks! She’s unofficially said yes already, but I still plan on doing it the old fashioned with-ring method, for formality’s sake :wink:

I don’t know of anything else other than diamonds and water that more colorless and clear and clear it is, the more people charge for it. But at least water is intrinsically valuable!

Other than color and clarity, a big part of increase in price of diamonds is how well it reflects “fire” (a jewelry term) and sparkles. There was an uproar in the 60’s and 70’s when new technologies allowed adding extra facets (which adds eye catching “fire” sparkles) to lower “quality” stones and made them more attractive and affordable to the general public.

If find the backtracking and marketing of this site hilarious: https://www.jewelry-secrets.com/Blog/are-diamonds-with-extra-facets-better/

"But let’s get into “Super Cuts”
Super cut diamonds are diamonds with extra facets on them, and the claim is that they have more fire and more sparkle than a standard brilliant cut diamond.

Do they?
Mmmm… Yes?

They do have more sparkles, but… (and this is a big but)… is this better? "

They acknowledge more facets makes a diamond sparkle more (which is a chief buying point), but then goes on to say how other factors such as color and clarity are more important. Ummm…so people are wrong for buying what they want? Shiny, shiny, sparkly, sparkly??? :smack: