Where can I get a vertical resting board used by actors

I’m referring to a wooden or plastic slab made to stand on-end for an actor to use to rest between takes. I saw one recently online in one of the pix posted by Peter Mayhew (Chewbacca) taken during filming of Star Wars. I saw one a long time ago in a Bette Davis movie in which she played an actress and wore a voluminous gown; she’d rest on one of these boards (wooden) between takes, and it had arm rests. I assume these boards were/are used so the actor won’t disturb his/her costume and makeup by sitting or lying down.

I had back surgery recently, and for now, standing is easier on me than sitting. (And sitting for a long time isn’t good regardless.) Anyway, when I saw the Mayhew photo I was reminded of the “resting board” and thought I could use one. I’ve searched to no avail. I don’t even know if I’d have room for something like it, but wanted to check it out.

Do you have the URL of this picture?

Photo.

I would bet those things are just knocked together by a carpenter, rather than being purchased.

This is a new concept to me…and -wow, that pic of Three-CPO (sp?) is ,well, odd…( but really cool! )
But it does look like something pretty to easy to make to your own measurements.
And then take it to a furniture place that does re-apholstery, and they can cover it with padding and vinyl covering.

I dunno…They might laugh at you, too… :slight_smile:
But it seems worth a try.

They’re called ‘leaning boards’.
Manduk is probably right, they must have been made by studio carpenters.
Here’s some blog posts so you can figure out how they were constructed.
http://poeticandchic.com/home/2010/12/1/in-praise-of-the-leaning-board.html
http://www.deepglamour.net/deep_glamour/2011/07/leaning-boards-behind-the-scenes-support-for-classic-hollywood-costumes.html
http://acertaincinema.com/media-tags/the-leaning-board/

I assumed they’re still used today, what with all the elaborate costumes with armor on them.

Dick York (the first Darren Stevens) injured his back falling off a horse during the filming of some sort of Western* before his Bewitched days. His pain got so bad that he needed a resting board set up on the sound stage where Bewitched was filmed. Eventually, it got so bad he couldn’t work anymore and he had to quit. That was why he was replaced by Dick Sargent.

*This was in the days where all male working actors survived by doing Westerns

Looking at all those pictures, it made me think that if you don’t want to make one (and to be honest, I wouldn’t, I’m no carpenter), you could probably get an inversion table and keep it locked in the up position. That might be tilted back further then you want it and you still have to ‘step’ into it more so then these leaning boards, but it’s probably better then nothing.

Here is what Amazon has for inversion tables; anything look like it would be useful?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&keywords=inversion+table&tag=mycroft02-20&index=blended&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325

One point I’d go for - this is from the 1964 World’s Fair - there was one hugely popular show in which the audience stood on “shelves” on a wall which was then raised into the performance area.
Yes, bizarre, but it got the maximum number of people unobstructed views and made turn-around a snap.

Anyway - get a tiny ridge on which your butt can rest - it won’t remove all weight from your feet, but will help.

Thanks everyone. I couldn’t make one and neither could my husband (and I’m handier than he is), but an inversion table is a great idea – maybe better than the leaning board. It would allow me to lean back a bit – better than standing straight up. (If I get one, I won’t try inverting till I check with my surgeon. :rolleyes:)

You mean IBM’s People Wall? (There’s a picture near the bottom with a close view.) Almost an IMAX theatre. Here’s another site with more detail. It does look like there is some sort of shelf-seat.

To the OP: It does look like there’s an angled board to work against your leaning against it, which does take up space. C-3PO’s picture sort of hides that. Though I suppose you could attach it to a wall for the support.