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Old 10-31-2007, 07:38 AM
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Whatcha readin' November edition


OK, we had enough interest here such that I guess we can try to do this monthly.

I am still reading the latest Potter. It has picked up and I'm enjoying it more than I was at first.

I am also still reading Alpine for you. I hate putting a book down, so I guess I will finish it, but I am underwhelmed. None of Ms. Hunter's characters are likable, including the protagonist Emily Andrew. I think she is striving to make them quirky, but for me they just come off as annoying. None of her male characters are pleasant at all, except for the "leading man" who may become the protagonist's love interest.

She doesn't seem to like men much. At one point the man paid to help run the vacation they are on has died. One character mentions that maybe he died from the stress of trying to be the perfect escort. Maddy's protagonist says that he probably read "one or two vacation books and threw some underwear into the suitcase - pretty stressful for a man."

She doesn't seem to like women much more than men, although she doesn't bash them quite as hard. Emily Andrew spends three month's rent on a watch just because she doesn't want the clerk to know she can't afford it. I can't imagine who this type of woman appeals to.

I am also reading some tech books, including one on a game development tool called 3D Game Studio. It looks like a lot of fun and I may play with game development again.
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Old 10-31-2007, 08:06 AM
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I've finished Mark Twain's San Francisco and most of Mark Twain's Letters from Hawaii, and the introduction (165 pages!) to The Annotated Huckleberry Finn, so I'm still on my Twain kick for now.
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Old 10-31-2007, 08:25 AM
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Halfway through Richard Russo's Risk Pool. Damn, he's a fine writer. I've read all of his books before, but thought I'd give them another run through. Fantastic.

Last week from the library I took out 3 Russos, a couple of David Halberstams including The Best and the Brightest, and a couple of brainless thrillers by one of my faves, Thomas Perry. I've got my work cut out for me!
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Old 10-31-2007, 08:26 AM
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Mostly I'm reading Retirement Plans: 401(k)s, IRAs, and Other Deferred Compensation Approaches for an exam I have to take in a few weeks.

For recreational reading, I'm re-reading Gulliver's Travels which I haven't read in about 25 years - I'm getting a lot more out of it now than when I was 13.

I'm also reading Simply Christian by N.T. Wright, but I've been on the same page for about four months now so at some point I'm going to have to admit it hasn't held my interest.

Last edited by Skammer; 10-31-2007 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 10-31-2007, 08:36 AM
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Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution by Eric Foner. Tamerlane turned me on to it and I've bought a couple of extra copies since to give as X-mas gifts since I've enjoyed it so.
  #6  
Old 10-31-2007, 08:47 AM
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Just finished How Starbucks saved my life: a son of privilege learns to live like everyone else, by Michael Gill. A big pile of glurgy crap. A formerly rich guy finds fulfillment in a low-prestige job. I read all the way to the end to see if he could teach me how to do it, but no. He was just weird.

Current book One red paperclip: or, how an ordinary man achieved his dreams with the help of a simple office supply, by Kyle MacDonald. You may have heard about this guy. He traded his way from a paperclip to a house in about fourteen trades. Light, fun book.

Car audiobook The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, by Stephen King, read by Anne Heche. I like to do my re-reading in the car. I'm not particularly enjoying Anne's interpretation, though. She sounds like she's reading to a kindergarten class. If there's another audiobook waiting for me at the library this weekend, I'll probably drop this.
  #7  
Old 10-31-2007, 09:09 AM
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Just finished Halting State by Charles Stross. Good near future police thriller, but I'm not a gamer, so I'm sure I missed many of the inside jokes.

Just started An Arsonists Guide to Authors home in New England by Brock Clarke, and already it has pulled me in deep. And I picked up the Space Opera Renaissance anthology for my Thanksgiving trip.

The two next on the pile are God is not Great by Hitchens and The Fourth Bear by Jasper Fforde. The last of the books I picked up on a trip to Powells this past Labor Day. After that I'm digging in to the Yiddish Policeman's Union by Chabon and Bad Monkeys by Matt Ruff. It's going to be a good month.
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Old 10-31-2007, 09:10 AM
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I just finished Pillars of the Earth, which was okay, and now I've started the first Flashman book. I've heard a few dopers talk about this series. So far the book is great - Flashman is like the anti-Sharpe.

Next I'll probably read some more of Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey books, picking up with Have His Carcase. I'm looking forward to the first book with Harriet Vane as a major character.
  #9  
Old 10-31-2007, 09:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dung Beetle
Just finished How Starbucks saved my life: a son of privilege learns to live like everyone else, by Michael Gill. A big pile of glurgy crap. A formerly rich guy finds fulfillment in a low-prestige job. I read all the way to the end to see if he could teach me how to do it, but no. He was just weird.
<SNIP>
I have looked at this more than once. I am a big ol' sap and so I kinda like gurgy crap, but I suspect that I would end up feeling as you did (that he is just weird.)
  #10  
Old 10-31-2007, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleanor of Aquitaine
I just finished Pillars of the Earth, which was okay, and now I've started the first Flashman book. I've heard a few dopers talk about this series. So far the book is great - Flashman is like the anti-Sharpe.

Next I'll probably read some more of Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey books, picking up with Have His Carcase. I'm looking forward to the first book with Harriet Vane as a major character.
To get the full flavour out of Flashman, it helps a bit to have read, at some point in your life, Tom Brown's School Days:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Brown's_Schooldays

Last edited by Malthus; 10-31-2007 at 09:53 AM.
  #11  
Old 10-31-2007, 09:59 AM
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I've had to read a lot of Great Literature over the past few years, so I'm taking a break with some fantasy and science fiction. I'm reading Charles de Lint's Jack the Giant-Killer right now. It's a library book so I need to finish it up soon. Up next is John Wyndham's Day of the Triffids which I decided I needed to read after a character in Friendly Hostility got a pet triffid over the summer.

Ah, my genre books. How I have missed you.
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  #12  
Old 10-31-2007, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khadaji
I have looked at this more than once. I am a big ol' sap and so I kinda like gurgy crap, but I suspect that I would end up feeling as you did (that he is just weird.)
I honestly can't recommend it. I guess the most interesting part was seeing what kind of a company Starbucks is to work for. According to Michael Gill, they're just peachy.

Spazcat
, I've got Day of the Triffids in my to-be-read pile too, but it's a long way down!

Last edited by Dung Beetle; 10-31-2007 at 10:29 AM.
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Old 10-31-2007, 11:59 AM
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I just (last night) finished Suite Française by Irene Nemirovsky. Two novellas published in one volume, both taking place in France during WWII. The first one is about people trying to flee Paris ahead of the German army, and the second is about the German occupation of a small French village.

Nemirovsky wrote them while she was living in an occupied French village during WWII. The two novellas were intended to be the beginning of a longer series. Instead, Nemirovsky eventually died at Auschwitz. I confess that I initially picked this up because her personal story seemed so compelling. The book itself is also excellent on its own, it reads as a series of snapshots of individuals whose lives intersect throughout the German occupation.

I am currently waiting for a book to come in the mail, which is annoying because I thought it would be here by now so I didn't plan ahead. Oh well, maybe a trip to the bookstore is in order (no really, twist my arm... )
  #14  
Old 10-31-2007, 12:17 PM
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I'm almost finished with Next Year in Cuba by Gustavo Perez-Firmat. Pretty interesting account of a historic* Cuban exile. Some of his experiences assimilating mirror mine, so it's touching. I like his description of his status as "living on the hyphen", not quite Cuban, not quite American.

My next one is Titan by Stephen Baxter. I'm in a little of a Baxter kick, since I just discovered him and find him very readable. I just wish one of his stories had a happy ending.



*historic = those who left right after Fidel took power.
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Old 10-31-2007, 02:15 PM
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I'm currently finishing up The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins and halfway through (which is pretty much "finishing up") The Blade Runner by Philip K. Dick.

I can't believe I've never read it before (Blade Runner, that is) as I'm really enjoying it and am also glad I haven't seen the movie. I plan to after I'm finished with the book but I am going to cut through the shit and head right for the director's cut.

After those are finished I plan to read Cunt: A Declaration of Independence by Inga Muscio.

After that, who knows. I'll either raid my bookshelves for books unread or raid someone else's as I'm wont to do.
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Old 10-31-2007, 02:34 PM
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I'm still working on World Without End. It shows how busy I've become...I think I polished Pillars of the Earth off in less than a week, but that was years ago.
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Old 10-31-2007, 02:41 PM
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I just finished Pratchett's Making Money. Fun book, but mostly forgettable, just like most of his other books. I'm pretty sure he just writes them using a template, but it's a fun template, so I don't mind.

Swinging to the other end of the spectrum, I'm just starting Flim-Flam by James Randi and I'm enjoying the hell out of it. Randi really takes the concept of "cranky exasperated old man" and runs with it.
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Old 10-31-2007, 02:41 PM
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I can't believe I've never read it before (Blade Runner, that is) as I'm really enjoying it and am also glad I haven't seen the movie. I plan to after I'm finished with the book but I am going to cut through the shit and head right for the director's cut.
The movie doesn't bear a lot of resemblance to the book. That's generally true in science fiction, but it's paticularly true of the work of Philip K. Dick. It makes me wonder why they try so hard to get his works for filming, when they're going to essentially jettison it all anyway. The closest movies get to his writing is the overblown Paycheck, o possibly a Scanner Drakly (I haven't read the book, so I can't say.)
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Old 10-31-2007, 02:42 PM
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I'm having a Chuck Palaniuk period (hell, is there supposed to be an H in his name? I just slam my hand on the keyboard and see what comes out!).
I just finished Survivor, now I'm halfway into Lullaby and next is Rant. They're good easy reads, I just have trouble finding time to do it.
Plus, when I'm just wanting to read a little I am keeping William Gay's I Hate To See That Evening Sun Go Down on the bedside table. It's a collection of short stories but I've only gone through a handful. If anyone can comment on Gay I'd love to hear feedback. I have been reading Chuck so much lately that anything other than his sometimes jarring writing style took me a minute or two to get used to!

Last edited by ShelliBean; 10-31-2007 at 02:43 PM. Reason: I can't finish a thought to save my life.
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Old 10-31-2007, 03:11 PM
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Finished The Time Traveler's Wife and am now continuing on with the Aubrey/Maturin series with Treason's Harbour.
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Old 10-31-2007, 03:16 PM
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Plus, when I'm just wanting to read a little I am keeping William Gay's I Hate To See That Evening Sun Go Down on the bedside table. It's a collection of short stories but I've only gone through a handful.
I like Gay. Have you read the Paperhanger story yet? ::shudder:: I've read two of his novels -- The Long Home and Provinces of Night. I liked them both, but was mildly annoyed at the similarities of plot and theme. It was almost like reading the same book. But that's my problem, not his. Writers often revisit things that affect them deeply, and as long as they're doing a good job, I shouldn't bitch about it.

Would you consider him Southern Gothic? Or Southern Realist/Naturalist? He reminded me a bit of Flannery O'Connor and Larry Brown.

Last edited by AuntiePam; 10-31-2007 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 10-31-2007, 03:29 PM
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Having finally finished "Middle Age", I have moved on to "The Memory Keeper's Daughter". Then it will be "Water for Elephants" and "Property".
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Old 10-31-2007, 03:40 PM
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I'm still on The Forsyte Saga, and am really, really hoping that the Irene-Soames-Bosinney triangle is resolved soon. It's fascinating, but I might put it on hold when the new Chabon book gets here.
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Old 10-31-2007, 03:41 PM
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I'm reading 1635: The Cannon Law, a recent part of a series by Eric Flint and a bunch or colloborators which began with 1632. It's an alternate history in which a West Virginia mining town, circa 2000, along with about 3,000 population, vehicles, guns, mine, power plant and whatnot, is transported whole into Germany during the Thirty Years War.

This one takes place a few years afterward, when the Americans, who now have a nation behind them (they allied with some down-timers to form the United States of Europe, which takes up some of Germany and some of Scandinavia), have set up an embassy in Rome. Then a Spanish cardinal attempts to take over the papacy by force and the Americans and their German and Italian friends get caught up in the fight. Not a deep, meaningful book, but loads of fun and sort of educational.
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Old 10-31-2007, 04:42 PM
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I like Gay. Have you read the Paperhanger story yet? ::shudder::

...

Would you consider him Southern Gothic? Or Southern Realist/Naturalist? He reminded me a bit of Flannery O'Connor and Larry Brown.
Yes, I read Paperhanger last time I picked it up about a week ago. It was chilling, and not one to read with your child napping in your arms!

I consider him heavy-handed Southern Gothic. I like it, but I am getting this vibe of "we're from the south and look how fucked up and weird we are!" like in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. I mean, I'm from the south and yeah, we're weird, but we ain't all homicidal!

ETA - I realize that's what makes it Gothic, but Gay seems a bit, I don't know, in-your-face about it. The 15000 btu Electric Chair just felt so cliched to me. The others I've ready are a bit better.

Last edited by ShelliBean; 10-31-2007 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 10-31-2007, 06:24 PM
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I mentioned Up Country, by Nelson DeMille in the October thread -- it's a long book and I'm a slow reader -- but who knew DeMille was such an engaging writer? I'm married to this book right now.

DeMille, a Vietnam veteran himself, went back in 1997 to write a magazine article and came home with the seeds of a what wound up being a really stunning little thriller. In the book, an Army investigator, who is also a Vietnam vet, goes back to present day Vietnam to try to solve a 30 year old homicide. So, we get a tour of the country as it is today, through the eyes of someone who was there in 1968.

Not to mentioned that we don't know who's working for who, why our hero was really sent there, whether the government of Vietnam is going to let him leave, who the girl is, why the murder took place, or whether they're all just going to tumble off some lonely potholed, ogforsaken road.

I've been on the edge of my futon for days now.
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Old 10-31-2007, 06:29 PM
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I've been on the edge of my futon for days now.
I like DeMille -- I remember liking Plum Island and another, the title escapes me. Sounds like this Viet Nam book has substance. Back to Amazon. Sigh. (A good sigh.)
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Old 10-31-2007, 07:00 PM
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I'm just finishing up Eight Skilled Gentlemen, and many thanks to the folks who recommended Barry Hughart's three Master Li and Number Ten Ox stories in the thread on fantasy reading. I've enjoyed these tremendously.

Among others on the November stack are:

Snake Agent by Liz Williams "John Constantine meets Chow Yun-Fat"
Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett
Kabbalah: a Love Story by Rabbi Lawrence Kushner
Death and the Chaste Apprentice by Robert Barnard "Irreverently humorous and captivating"
Radiant Mind by Peter Fenner
A Death in Vienna by Frank Tallis 1902 Vienna and new trends in psychology
Never Turn Away by Rigdzin Shikpo
Finding Water by Julia Cameron the latest in the Artist's Way series, with the theme of persistence.

I'll be spending lots of time in airports and in elder care, so I wanted to make sure I had airport/airplane/waiting room reading. I always choose and pack my books before I choose and pack clothes...
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Old 10-31-2007, 07:06 PM
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Shit, I haven't made any progress on my October reads. And, if you haven't noticed, it's still October!
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Old 10-31-2007, 07:07 PM
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I just finished my six month long project to read every Hugo winning science fiction novel (Rainbows End was entertaining although I think Vinge pushed his destruction of creativity theme a bit too far).

Now for the first time in a while I'm casting about for what to read next. Next one on my list is probably going to be Wintersmith, the only one of Pratchett's Discworld books that I haven't read yet and its sitting in my "To read" pile. I've also now read about 65% of Lois McMaster Bujold's total output and since I enjoyed at least the science fiction ones I feel like I should finish those off. I still haven't read the last three Harry Potter books and while I'm not a fan of the series I want to read them at some point just so I'll understand what the fans are talking about. I want to read a bit more of CJ Cherryh's science fiction as well...
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Old 11-01-2007, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by The Chao Goes Mu
I'm... halfway through (which is pretty much "finishing up") The Blade Runner by Philip K. Dick. I can't believe I've never read it before (Blade Runner, that is)....
Do you have it under that title? If so, you might have the novelization for the movie (I forget who did that). The book on which the movie is VERY loosely based is Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

I just finished Somerset Maugham's The Painted Veil, about a young English couple in 1920s China and the crisis which, to a degree, brings them back together after he discovers she's been unfaithful. I liked it and hadn't thought I would.

I've just begun Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Love in the Time of Cholera, which I'm only about 20 pages into. So far, I'm not diggin' it much. We'll see. I've had Tolkien's "new" book The Children of Hurin on my bedside table for months now, but haven't gotten far in it. I'm also browsing through the Library of America's edition of H.P. Lovecraft's works, and am now reading "At the Mountains of Madness." Creepy. A college friend was gaga for Lovecraft but I've never actually read any of his stories from start to finish.

Last edited by Elendil's Heir; 11-01-2007 at 12:07 AM.
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Old 11-01-2007, 12:52 AM
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I'm also browsing through the Library of America's edition of H.P. Lovecraft's works, and am now reading "At the Mountains of Madness." Creepy. A college friend was gaga for Lovecraft but I've never actually read any of his stories from start to finish.
That one's my favorite. Guillermo del Toro is working on a movie version.
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Old 11-01-2007, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir
Do you have it under that title? If so, you might have the novelization for the movie (I forget who did that). The book on which the movie is VERY loosely based is Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
It has both titles on the cover but it's definitely a post-movie printing. Harrison Ford is also on the cover. I never thought about the possibility of it being a novelization of the movie. I figured they were just promoting the movie. Aaaargh. I feel ripped off. It's not my copy, it's my partner's from a class she had in college. She hated the book but she's not a fan of sci-fi at all. (I still love her though.)
  #34  
Old 11-01-2007, 08:40 AM
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Do you have it under that title? If so, you might have the novelization for the movie (I forget who did that). The book on which the movie is VERY loosely based is Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
There is no novelization of the movie -- they've been printing Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep" with the Bladerunner movie poster (and title) on the cover ever since the fim came out a quarter of a century ago. This is starting to challenge those long-time leaders of Unchanged SF Movie Tie-In Covers, Fantastic Voyage, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Planet of the Apes. I know. I've read 'em all.
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Old 11-01-2007, 08:46 AM
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Just started An Arsonists Guide to Authors home in New England by Brock Clarke, and already it has pulled me in deep. And I picked up the Space Opera Renaissance anthology for my Thanksgiving trip.
I was fondling An Arsonist's Guide at Borders; perhaps now I'll actually buy it. I just finished Mark Haddon's A Spot of Bother, which I liked. It's not as inventive a story as The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, but it was funny and sad and in all, an enjoyable way to spend a few days.

I've just started Haruki Murakami's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World and I'm having some trouble getting into it. I'm about 50-odd pages in, so I'll decide whether I want to bail out or not soon, but so far I'm not connecting with anything or anyone in the book. I've still got Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma sitting on the shelf.
  #36  
Old 11-01-2007, 09:00 AM
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I used to force my way to the end of every book. Then (mostly for my book club, which sometimes picks stuff I don't care for) I adopted a 100-page rule: if the author hadn't hooked me by then, I knew he or she probably never would, and I could put the book down guilt-free. Eventually I came across a book so soul-destroyingly bad (I forget what it was, probably due to PTSD) that I went to a 50-page rule, and that's worked out well for me ever since.
  #37  
Old 11-01-2007, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir
I used to force my way to the end of every book. Then (mostly for my book club, which sometimes picks stuff I don't care for) I adopted a 100-page rule: if the author hadn't hooked me by then, I knew he or she probably never would, and I could put the book down guilt-free. Eventually I came across a book so soul-destroyingly bad (I forget what it was, probably due to PTSD) that I went to a 50-page rule, and that's worked out well for me ever since.
I am starting to do something similar. I have no hard and fast rule, but if I'm still not into a book after about 1/3 I usually put it down. It still feels wrong to do. Dating back from a time when I had more time and less money, I read anything I bought. Now I have much less time and more money and I just don't like to spend it reading something bad.
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Old 11-01-2007, 09:21 AM
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Exactly. I've come to the conclusion that life's too short, and there are too many other great books worth reading, to force your way to the end of a book you hate (if you don't have to read it, of course, such as for a class or a job).
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Old 11-01-2007, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham
There is no novelization of the movie -- they've been printing Dick's "Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep" with the Bladerunner movie poster (and title) on the cover ever since the fim came out a quarter of a century ago. This is starting to challenge those long-time leaders of Unchanged SF Movie Tie-In Covers, Fantastic Voyage, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Planet of the Apes. I know. I've read 'em all.
Phew! I have to say, I would've been surprised if it was a novelization because it's a great book. The only thing that's annoying is the person who had it before my partner wrote tons of notes in the margins. Ridiculous notes which show an uncanny ability for pointing out the painfully obvious. My favorite notes are the ones where the girl spoils something in the book that is coming up in a few pages. I keep daydreaming that Deckard "retires" her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir
I used to force my way to the end of every book. Then (mostly for my book club, which sometimes picks stuff I don't care for) I adopted a 100-page rule: if the author hadn't hooked me by then, I knew he or she probably never would, and I could put the book down guilt-free. Eventually I came across a book so soul-destroyingly bad (I forget what it was, probably due to PTSD) that I went to a 50-page rule, and that's worked out well for me ever since.
Oh so you've tried to read Dan Brown's work too eh?

Last edited by The Chao Goes Mu; 11-01-2007 at 09:28 AM.
  #40  
Old 11-01-2007, 10:03 AM
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I don't recall what I listed for October, but I guess I must have finished them, since I carry around new books. I'm reading (alternatingly) The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer on the train; I like Morrison's book, but Chaucer is hard work. Still, it seems something one's got to have read at some point. My further November reading will be, probably in that order, if I finish any of it:

Hamlet, by William Shakespeare. I need to re-read this for class, and excellent excuse to get a good Cambridge edition copy instead of the crappy cheap Penguin I have now.
Tom Jones, by Henry Fielding
Moby Dick, by Herman Melville, also for class (but more tentatively). I also have a crappy Penguin of that, which I couldn't get through. I hope the annotated one (Norton) will help me a little with the damned symbolism.
I've got absolutely no non-fiction around, which is a bloody shame. Must get myself something of that.

I'll also put in a plug for Amsterdam, by Ian McEwan. Not a good deal moneywise (took me about four hours to read and cost ten bucks), but a very good read. Had to read this for the same Hamlet class that I'm also reading Hamlet for, but so far I find the connection tenous...
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Old 11-01-2007, 10:26 AM
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Nothing. Six weeks to vacation and nothing left in the book bag. I am not finished with Mary Gentle's Grunts! I am about to give it to the parrot.
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Old 11-01-2007, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Chao Goes Mu
...Oh so you've tried to read Dan Brown's work too eh?
I read (for my book club, as it happens), finished and actually liked The DaVinci Code, despite its farfetched ahistorical silliness. Haven't read any of his other stuff, and probably never will.
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Old 11-01-2007, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir
I read (for my book club, as it happens), finished and actually liked The DaVinci Code, despite its farfetched ahistorical silliness. Haven't read any of his other stuff, and probably never will.

I enjoyed DaVinci Code too. It was childish but a fun read. I read a few of his other books and the result was me wanting to gouge out my eyes with a mellon baller.
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Old 11-01-2007, 12:23 PM
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I'm reading Jim Butcher's White Night at the moment, and when I'm done, I have the choice of China Mieville's UnLunDun, Trevor Corson's The Zen of Fish, or Mercedes Lackey's Fortune's Fool. Grad school's gotten kind of hectic lately, so may not meet the goal of 50 books this year. I'm working on #38 right now.
  #45  
Old 11-01-2007, 12:26 PM
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I'm halfway through re-reading Gravity's Rainbow. I'm getting a lot more out of it than last time. As someone mentioned in the October thread, it's best in small doses.

Also, Statistics, the easy way.
  #46  
Old 11-01-2007, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Just Some Guy
I've also now read about 65% of Lois McMaster Bujold's total output and since I enjoyed at least the science fiction ones I feel like I should finish those off.
I read the first two novels of the Sharing Knife series and I just couldn't get that into it, as she created this amazing world with neat creatures and abilities in it, and then wastes a lot of time on romance novel issues. Personally, it's nice when authors acknowledge that people have sex, but I felt that it could have been better served with a little more thought into demonstrating more of how the world works.

Would you recommend anything by her that I might like better?
  #47  
Old 11-01-2007, 01:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Chao Goes Mu
I enjoyed DaVinci Code too. It was childish but a fun read. I read a few of his other books and the result was me wanting to gouge out my eyes with a mellon baller.
That's what I've heard from others, too. I once asked my (Episcopal) priest what he thought of The DaVinci Code, and he rolled his eyes a little and said, "There's a reason it's on the Fiction shelves at the bookstore."
  #48  
Old 11-01-2007, 02:07 PM
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I just finished A Pirate Looks At Fifty by Jimmy Buffet. A very nice, very light read.

I am just now starting Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist's Guide to Global Warming by Bjorn Lomborg.
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Old 11-01-2007, 02:23 PM
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Making Money by Pterry.
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Old 11-01-2007, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashiitashii
I read the first two novels of the Sharing Knife series and I just couldn't get that into it, as she created this amazing world with neat creatures and abilities in it, and then wastes a lot of time on romance novel issues. Personally, it's nice when authors acknowledge that people have sex, but I felt that it could have been better served with a little more thought into demonstrating more of how the world works.

Would you recommend anything by her that I might like better?
Her Vorkosigan series (sci-fi) is very good. It starts with Shards of Honor, but you could probably pick up most of the books and read them stand-alone.

I recently read the first two books in her other fantasy series, which starts with The Curse of Chalion. I enjoyed them, and they're light on the romance. In this series she's invented an interesting and detailed religion, and as always with Bujold's books, the hero/heroine is atypical; a weak and injured man in the first, and a middle-aged woman in the second.
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