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  #1  
Old 06-07-2011, 04:28 PM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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What's it called: paintings you stand behind and stick your face in

Sorry, don't know how else to describe them. They are usually painted on plywood, sometimes they're more sculptural. They usually have cartoony people painted on the, but where the faces are supposed to be is a hole and you'r supposed to stand behind it and put your face their so you're the character.

Here is an example.

Do these things have a name?
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  #2  
Old 06-07-2011, 04:33 PM
Kimstu Kimstu is online now
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I've seen them called "your face here" cutouts, or just cardboard cutouts.
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  #3  
Old 06-07-2011, 04:38 PM
dolphinboy dolphinboy is offline
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According to this http://www.ecievents.net/Photography..._Novelties.htm they are called "Carnival Funny Photos". Scroll down towards the bottom of the page...

Last edited by dolphinboy; 06-07-2011 at 04:39 PM..
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  #4  
Old 06-07-2011, 04:42 PM
freakstasy freakstasy is offline
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Comic foregrounds
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  #5  
Old 06-08-2011, 01:25 AM
onion onion is offline
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Standees.
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  #6  
Old 06-08-2011, 12:27 PM
Kimstu Kimstu is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onion View Post
Standees.
AFAICT, "standee" in the sense of "life-size standalone photo portrait" generally refers to an image of some celebrity with that celebrity's own face attached. Not to a life-size portrait setting with a "your face here" hole cut in it, which seems to be what the OP is referring to.

From dictionary.com:
Quote:
2. standee - a lifesize cardboard cutout (usually of a celebrity); "he had his picture taken with a standee of the president"
What the OP's talking about would have to be called a "paste your face (or place your face) standee" (although that seems to refer more to a custom-made standee incorporating a photo of the individual's face rather than a cutout with a face-shaped hole in it). Or better, a "faceless standee".
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  #7  
Old 06-10-2011, 12:45 PM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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Sorry, to have abandoned the thread - got unexpectedly busy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimstu View Post
I've seen them called "your face here" cutouts, or just cardboard cutouts.
Thanks! "Cutout" is probably it because it would be appropriate for a canvas backdrop as well as wood or cardboard versions.

"Carnival Funny Photo" sounds like something a company would make up because they don't know what they're called either. And it makes me think more of those funny photos where you dress up as a cowboy or gangster and get photographed in a fake "vintage B&W setting."
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  #8  
Old 06-10-2011, 09:18 PM
Kevbo Kevbo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Swallowed My Cellphone View Post
...photographed in a fake "vintage B&W setting."
Well now THAT I do know the word for: The yellowish, old timey looking photographs are "sepia" toned.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sepia_(color)

Last edited by Kevbo; 06-10-2011 at 09:19 PM..
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  #9  
Old 12-09-2012, 04:30 PM
JK55092 JK55092 is offline
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tintamarresque
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  #10  
Old 12-09-2012, 04:46 PM
Michael63129 Michael63129 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JK55092 View Post
tintamarresque
A Google search seems to indicate that is a French word with no English equivalent, even when I try to translate it (closest is "billboard with a face cut-out").

Also, note the date of the last post; its annoying when people revive an old thread just to post (and why did you sign up just to do so?).
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  #11  
Old 12-09-2012, 05:22 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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As it happens, this thing (whatever you want to call it) happens to have been part of one of the biggest TV disasters of all time. It was a show that was so bad that it was cancelled after the first episode. The host of the show (Jackie Gleason) filled up the time period the next week just in apologizing for how bad the show was. I looked up a bunch of websites about the show in hopes that it would give me the name for this item. There doesn't seem to be any very standard name. One name they are called is carnival cardboard cutouts, although I don't think they are usually made of cardboard. Here's some websites about the show:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You're_in_the_Picture

http://www.tvparty.com/picture.html

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5k...ictur_creation

http://www.tvobscurities.com/spotlig...-gleason-show/

http://www.tv.pop-cult.com/youre-in-the-picture.html

http://www.aoltv.com/2010/03/14/jack...ore-people-do/
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  #12  
Old 12-11-2012, 04:48 AM
Toxylon Toxylon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael63129 View Post
Also, note the date of the last post; its annoying when people revive an old thread just to post (and why did you sign up just to do so?).
Given that we're fighting ignorance here, and this is General Questions, what's it to you that someone who has an answer to some old, undisclosed question shows up here? People have all kinds of motives to sign up, their reasons are completely irrelevant. It's not like we are discussing personal IMHO issues or current hot-button politics in this case, anyway.

Sorry for the hijack.
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  #13  
Old 12-11-2012, 07:18 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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I can't find any evidence that the French word "tintamarresque" means anything like what we're talking about. In fact, it's not even a noun. It's an adjective in French:

http://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/tintamarresque
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  #14  
Old 12-11-2012, 09:51 AM
gatorslap gatorslap is offline
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The -esque suffix means it's an adjective. Google translates tintamarre as "hurly-burly", so tintamarresque would be the adjective form of that. Hurly-burly-esque.
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  #15  
Old 12-11-2012, 09:58 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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That's nice, but where's the proof that either the noun or the adjective mean anything connected with the subject of this thread?
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  #16  
Old 12-11-2012, 10:49 AM
gatorslap gatorslap is offline
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I'm pretty sure they don't.
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  #17  
Old 12-11-2012, 09:03 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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So what was the point of your post (#14)? I said that it was an adjective. The link that I had in my point gave the definition in French, and it was clear from it that neither it nor the noun it was derived from had anything to do with the subject of the thread. What point were you making with your post?
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  #18  
Old 12-11-2012, 11:22 PM
PlainJain PlainJain is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
So what was the point of your post (#14)? I said that it was an adjective. The link that I had in my point gave the definition in French, and it was clear from it that neither it nor the noun it was derived from had anything to do with the subject of the thread. What point were you making with your post?
He's just being timtamarresque.
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  #19  
Old 12-11-2012, 11:28 PM
gatorslap gatorslap is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
So what was the point of your post (#14)? I said that it was an adjective. The link that I had in my point gave the definition in French, and it was clear from it that neither it nor the noun it was derived from had anything to do with the subject of the thread. What point were you making with your post?
That you were correct? Jeez, I didn't know I had to be disagreeing to reply.
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  #20  
Old 12-11-2012, 11:30 PM
ed anger ed anger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael63129 View Post
A Google search seems to indicate that is a French word with no English equivalent, even when I try to translate it (closest is "billboard with a face cut-out").

Also, note the date of the last post; its annoying when people revive an old thread just to post (and why did you sign up just to do so?).
a lot must annoy you then.

the facts are never out of style.
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  #21  
Old 12-12-2012, 06:02 AM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorslap View Post
The -esque suffix means it's an adjective.
Not always.

burlesque, noun
1. an artistic composition, especially literary or dramatic, that, for the sake of laughter, vulgarizes lofty material or treats ordinary material with mock dignity.
...
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  #22  
Old 12-12-2012, 07:59 AM
Pas2 Pas2 is offline
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The Finnish word for this kind of thing is tintamareski and the origin is given in various places as coming from the French théâtre tintamarresque which supposedly means a theatrical performance done with this kind of a setup.

Finnish wikipedia cites a newspaper article from 2006 as the source, but I recall seeing a comedic play done in this style called a "tintamareski" in Antero Vipunen, a Finnish book of games, plays and distractions for children first printed in 1950 (although my copy is a later printing, so don't know if the first printing had that bit). A Google image search for tintamareski provides plenty of examples of this word being used in this fashion.

I can't find any evidence of théâtre tintamarresque used to mean a performance like this, but tintamareski also doesn't sound like a word with Finnish origins, so I'm guessing it's either a funny word just made up for Antero Vipunen or inspired by some imagery related to early Tintamarre celebrations and someone has just made up a foreign origin for it later.
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  #23  
Old 12-12-2012, 01:06 PM
Michael63129 Michael63129 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed anger View Post
a lot must annoy you then.

the facts are never out of style.
Right

Here is a thread in ATMB where people complain about old threads being revived, one of many no doubt (here is another; both include suggestions like automatic locking of old threads). It really IS annoying to have years or even decades old threads revived, largely by people you sign up ONLY to make a post in them (so far JK55092 only has one post, last visit date same as their sign-up date).
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  #24  
Old 12-13-2012, 04:16 PM
Sternvogel Sternvogel is offline
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Cassius Marcellus Coolidge, whose other claims to fame include the "Dogs Playing Poker" paintings, created what he called

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
"Comic Foregrounds," novelty photographs which combined a portrait of the sitter with a caricatured body, produced by the sitter holding between two sticks a canvas on which Coolidge drew or painted the caricature, the final product being similar to the photographs produced at midways and carnivals when sitters place their heads into openings in life-size caricatures.
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  #25  
Old 12-14-2012, 03:47 AM
Richard Pearse Richard Pearse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
That's nice, but where's the proof that either the noun or the adjective mean anything connected with the subject of this thread?
Did you do an image search on tintamarresque?
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  #26  
Old 12-14-2012, 04:57 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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Interesting. A Google Images search gives this:

http://www.google.com/search?num=10&...ac.SdF1MBT8Vj0

One website that I found is this:

http://www.getcrafty.com/forum/frees...at-called.html

However, none of the regular dictionaries or the online ones that I've been able to check define the term in the sense that we're talking about here.
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  #27  
Old 12-14-2012, 05:53 AM
GuanoLad GuanoLad is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
However, none of the regular dictionaries or the online ones that I've been able to check define the term in the sense that we're talking about here.
I don't think it's a directly translatable word. It's like "Vaudeville"; It's a very commonly known term, of course, but a literal translation would not stand up to casual scrutiny (it's apparently derived from the name of a town in France, "the valley of Vire"), but we all know it refers to music hall entertainment, not an obvious leap of logic to formulate.

I'd take Pas2's post as a reasonable cite for "tintamarresque".
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  #28  
Old 12-14-2012, 06:17 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is online now
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There are lots of cases of words in one language (call it language A) which can only be translated into a second language (call it language B) using a long and clumsy phrase. That doesn't mean that dictionary makers for dictionaries giving the equivalents in B of words in language A get to just skip the word entirely. If the word is sufficiently common in language A, they have to include it (and, in practice, they do always include it) in their dictionary. They just give that long and clumsy phrase as the translation. Anything else would be bad dictionary practice.
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  #29  
Old 12-14-2012, 07:57 AM
Richard Pearse Richard Pearse is offline
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Well the Google images search certainly suggests that there is a link between the word and pictures with holes for people to put their faces in. I wonder if the Fins borrowed the French word prior to it becoming associated with pictures with the heads cut out, i.e, you won't find that meaning in French but its Finnish version was originally from a French word meaning hurly burly, clanger, or din.

This wiki page makes mention of "tintamarresque theatre" involving pictures with holes for actors to place their heads.
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