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Old 05-15-2013, 01:32 AM
astro astro is offline
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"Makeup for Men Is on the Rise—and No Longer a Taboo" I call shenanigans on this perennial BS claim

I'm 54 and I've seen this claim practically every year by fashion articles. This might be true in certain youth oriented genres like emo/goth dress up, the urban music and artsy fartsy fashion scene or for some gay men, but the vast majority of men have no interest in wearing concealer, makeup and eyeliner etc.

Here it is yet again.

Makeup for Men Is on the Rise—and No Longer a Taboo

Has this claim ever been true? Why do they keep making it?

Quote:
Androgyny is once again in fashion, and just in time: the long arm of gender equality has extended its reach past the boardrooms and into our bathrooms (and medicine cabinets). American consumers spent over $5 billion on men’s grooming products last year, over half of which went into skin care and cosmetics, according to the market data firm Euromonitor International (in 1997, by way of comparison, they spent $2.4 billion). By becoming attuned to the beauty industry, men are now openly availing themselves of the same opportunities afforded to women.


And it makes sense: if the whole mating game and song and dance (and so, to a large degree, human existence) is about power and seduction, why wouldn’t men employ tools that would stealthily make them appear to be more attractive, healthier, and generally successful? (Just be careful of your word choice: when it comes to the “rougher” sex, it appears that the use of the word “grooming”—which brings to mind the virility and polish of racehorses—is preferred industrywide over “makeup.”) One might wonder what’s taken them so long to join ranks; after all, blemishes don’t care whether you have a Y chromosome.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:34 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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Originally Posted by astro View Post
Why do they keep making it?
How much money do you think the fashion industry makes off men not wearing make-up?
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:58 AM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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The only make-up you will ever find on me is when I have to scratch my nose when my hands are covered in the grime from the underside of one of my cars I happen to be working on at the time.

Lately, its been the old Ford.
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Old 05-15-2013, 02:15 AM
Gary T Gary T is offline
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Originally Posted by astro View Post
Has this claim ever been true? Why do they keep making it?
I suspect wishful thinking, aided by some reporter who's thrilled to think he might be hipper than thou.
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Old 05-15-2013, 02:26 AM
Jeff Lichtman Jeff Lichtman is online now
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The fashion industry wants it to be true so they can sell more makeup. It's not that they believe it - they run these articles to get other people to believe it.
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Old 05-15-2013, 04:12 AM
bldysabba bldysabba is offline
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Factoid time. In India it's pretty common for Muslim men to wear eyeliner.
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Old 05-15-2013, 04:21 AM
jz78817 jz78817 is offline
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PROTIP: the entire purpose of fashion, lifestyle, and entertainment "news" is to get people to buy shit.

sadly, it must work.
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Old 05-15-2013, 04:46 AM
panache45 panache45 is online now
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Isn't it bad enough that some guys are making their eyebrows DAINTY . . . or changing their eyebrows' shape in spite of the shape of their face?
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:08 AM
gracer gracer is offline
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The article mentions "$5 billion on men’s grooming products", so that probably means men's deodorant, shaving cream, after shave face cream and some hair product aimed specifically at men. I think there are also far more shower gels and shampoos marketed towards men now.

A pretty far cry from make up.
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Old 05-15-2013, 06:32 AM
Saraya Saraya is offline
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Originally Posted by astro View Post
I'm 54 and I've seen this claim practically every year by fashion articles. This might be true in certain youth oriented genres like emo/goth dress up, the urban music and artsy fartsy fashion scene or for some gay men, but the vast majority of men have no interest in wearing concealer, makeup and eyeliner etc.

Here it is yet again.

Makeup for Men Is on the Rise—and No Longer a Taboo

Has this claim ever been true? Why do they keep making it?
This is a bi-product or symptom of the big social surge to make women into men and men into women.
Just swing by any preschool or early grade classrooms at your local elementary school. You'll find little boys being coached and molded into submissive drones to serve the woman.

What woman or women I don't know; sure as hell not me. I wish men would go back to being men and act less like faggots - regardless of their sexual orientation.

Last edited by Saraya; 05-15-2013 at 06:34 AM.
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Old 05-15-2013, 06:45 AM
gracer gracer is offline
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What woman or women I don't know; sure as hell not me. I wish men would go back to being men and act less like faggots - regardless of their sexual orientation.
And I wish people would not be homophobic, would stop using offensive language and would let children just be who they are. I guess we both aren't getting what we want.
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Old 05-15-2013, 06:48 AM
Maastricht Maastricht is offline
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Astro, these are the same people who have been claiming hats will get back into fashion. Not going to happen either.

I concur with 95% of magazine info on make-up being written as editiorials, paid for by cosmetics.
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:13 AM
Idle Thoughts Idle Thoughts is offline
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Originally Posted by Saraya
wish men would go back to being men and act less like faggots - regardless of their sexual orientation.
This is out of line and borders on trolling/hate speech. You are being warned and know that the staff are now discussing your future posting privileges.

Last edited by Idle Thoughts; 05-15-2013 at 07:15 AM.
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:15 AM
even sven even sven is offline
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FWIW, plenty of men do wear "acne treatment" with concealer included. They just don't think of it as make-up.
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Old 05-15-2013, 07:40 AM
VunderBob VunderBob is offline
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My secret is out. I've spent more on my face paint than I ever did on my ghillie suit.
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Old 05-15-2013, 08:11 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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If "androgyny is back in fashion", that'll play hell with attempts to market Huggies and strained peaches to breeders.

We could have a full-scale retail war on our hands.
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Old 05-15-2013, 08:12 AM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
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If "androgyny is back in fashion", that'll play hell with attempts to market Huggies and strained peaches to breeders.

We could have a full-scale retail war on our hands.
Androgyny doesn't mean asexual.
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Old 05-15-2013, 08:50 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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The thing is, I think guys are kind of stupidly stubborn about these things. My SO has incredibly long, thick eyelashes, that are forever falling into his eyes and hurting him. I mean it - his lashes (and his hair) are so thick I have found them EMBEDDED into his and my skin. I occasionally suggest helping him look for some mascara, something very light and mild, to help him keep his lashes away from his eyes, but he wouldn't consider it even if they were making him blind. And I'm sure there's mascara out there just to pull the lashes away from the eye - he certainly doesn't need thickening or length.

God, that last sentence sounds filthy. Anyway, I'm sure lots of guys could use some stuff - like foundation and concealer at the very least, to cover acne or acne scars. BUT there is this cultural NO! That goes on.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:02 AM
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With the exception of a couple of very out gay guys I'm friends with, I don't know of any straight men who wear anything approaching makeup, and even the gay guys just do a bit of eyeliner.

However, the men's grooming product market has exploded. When I was a kid/teenager, it was pretty much some combination of Edge, Foamy or Barbasol for shave cream, Aqua Velva or Skin Bracer for aftershave, and either cheap-ass hair spray or gel or something like Brylcreem or Vitalis if you wanted gender-specific hair products. Soap was soap, with the general options of Zest, Coast, Irish Spring, Safeguard, Dial or Lifebuoy.

Now, there are probably easily a dozen separate shaving products- foams, gels, non-foaming creams, and then each one has a counterpart balm that goes with it, and some lines even have pre-shave, shave, and post-shave products, as well as general-purpose moisturizers and stuff. You have all the soaps above, plus another dozen or more types of body washes, hair and body washes, hair and body wash + shave cream, etc... And all the dandruff shampoos are mostly marketed toward men as well. Then there are body sprays and other stuff like that as well.

I'll admit that the products can work well- I do like different shaving creams and see some value in aftershave balm, but I don't really need bodywash, body spray, or pre-shave conditioner, nor do I need all manner of hair products, etc...

I guess if I was 13, it might make more sense.
  #20  
Old 05-15-2013, 10:28 AM
gracer gracer is offline
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Originally Posted by Anaamika View Post
The thing is, I think guys are kind of stupidly stubborn about these things. My SO has incredibly long, thick eyelashes, that are forever falling into his eyes and hurting him. I mean it - his lashes (and his hair) are so thick I have found them EMBEDDED into his and my skin. I occasionally suggest helping him look for some mascara, something very light and mild, to help him keep his lashes away from his eyes, but he wouldn't consider it even if they were making him blind. And I'm sure there's mascara out there just to pull the lashes away from the eye - he certainly doesn't need thickening or length.

God, that last sentence sounds filthy. Anyway, I'm sure lots of guys could use some stuff - like foundation and concealer at the very least, to cover acne or acne scars. BUT there is this cultural NO! That goes on.
There is clear mascara, so basically hair gel for eyelashes.

Find a brand that doesn't look like mascara and tell him it's hair gel for eye lashes.
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Old 05-15-2013, 10:55 AM
gallows fodder gallows fodder is offline
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The thing is, I think guys are kind of stupidly stubborn about these things. My SO has incredibly long, thick eyelashes, that are forever falling into his eyes and hurting him. I mean it - his lashes (and his hair) are so thick I have found them EMBEDDED into his and my skin. I occasionally suggest helping him look for some mascara, something very light and mild, to help him keep his lashes away from his eyes, but he wouldn't consider it even if they were making him blind. And I'm sure there's mascara out there just to pull the lashes away from the eye - he certainly doesn't need thickening or length.

God, that last sentence sounds filthy. Anyway, I'm sure lots of guys could use some stuff - like foundation and concealer at the very least, to cover acne or acne scars. BUT there is this cultural NO! That goes on.
How would he feel about curling them with a curler? Would that be too girly for him?
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Old 05-15-2013, 11:08 AM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
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I don't have anything against makeup. It's fun to play with and done correctly makes me look much more masculine than I do naturally.

But I would rather women stop using makeup as a general trend rather than men start because I want to get to the bar before 11.
  #23  
Old 05-15-2013, 11:12 AM
Dogzilla Dogzilla is offline
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I don't care about makeup on men at all.

But I do wish it was more socially acceptable for men to carry purses. That way, when I'm hanging out with one, I won't have to carry all his shit in mine.
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Old 05-15-2013, 12:54 PM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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I don't care about makeup on men at all.

But I do wish it was more socially acceptable for men to carry purses. That way, when I'm hanging out with one, I won't have to carry all his shit in mine.
Yes!
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Old 05-15-2013, 12:59 PM
miss elizabeth miss elizabeth is offline
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I don't know any men who wear makeup on a regular basis, or wear it sober, but I wish I did. Makeup is FUN!

Although I sometimes have slumber parties with a small group of friends (including guys) and we usually end up wearing makeup and wigs by the end of the night. Good times.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:08 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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There is clear mascara, so basically hair gel for eyelashes.

Find a brand that doesn't look like mascara and tell him it's hair gel for eye lashes.
Clear mascara! That is f-ing brilliant. You may have really done him a favor. I will go post-haste and find some.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gallows fodder
How would he feel about curling them with a curler? Would that be too girly for him?
Too girly and too much maintenance....but spending forever in the bathroom trying to pick them out with a wet Q-tip is just fine, apparently.

Dogzilla, I bought my man a murse (basically a messenger bag) from LL Bean. It's MANLY! GRRR!
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:19 PM
control-z control-z is offline
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I have never ever looked at myself in the mirror and saw any problem that made me think "if only men could wear makeup."

They can try to make makeup for men a thing, but it's not gonna happen.
  #28  
Old 05-15-2013, 01:39 PM
DiosaBellissima DiosaBellissima is offline
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FWIW, plenty of men do wear "acne treatment" with concealer included. They just don't think of it as make-up.
Ding ding ding. It's funny, I know quite a few men who wear tinted moisturizer or use acne treatments with built in concealer. The companies are just smart and don't call it that, because- as we can see in this thread- a lot of men freak out at the thought of wearing makeup.

Jezebel put guys in some tinted moisturizer and I think the improvement is great. It evens out their complexions nicely.
  #29  
Old 05-15-2013, 01:48 PM
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Clear mascara! That is f-ing brilliant. You may have really done him a favor. I will go post-haste and find some.



Too girly and too much maintenance....but spending forever in the bathroom trying to pick them out with a wet Q-tip is just fine, apparently.
I think mascara, even clear, is more girly than using an eyelash curler. Although they are both pretty girly and I don't think men I know would dream of doing either. But mascara leaves an actual product behind and an eyelash curler is just a tool. Anyone with eyelashes that don't curl up naturally should use one!
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:51 PM
Procrustus Procrustus is offline
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I think mascara, even clear, is more girly than using an eyelash curler. Although they are both pretty girly and I don't think men I know would dream of doing either. But mascara leaves an actual product behind and an eyelash curler is just a tool. Anyone with eyelashes that don't curl up naturally should use one!
Serious question: Why?
  #31  
Old 05-15-2013, 01:53 PM
DiosaBellissima DiosaBellissima is offline
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Serious question: Why?
Because if your eyelashes are long enough, they'll poke you in the eye (like Anaamika's spouse's do). Even when I'm not wearing makeup, I'll curl my lashes so I don't get poked.
  #32  
Old 05-15-2013, 01:54 PM
Inner Stickler Inner Stickler is offline
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To keep them out of one's eyes and thereby reduce irritation and distraction caused by errant eyelashes on the eyeball.

Also, things look better when they're orderly.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:57 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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Especially if you wear glasses, because your eyelashes can and will drag across the inside of your glasses and get pushed into your eyes.

Mine curl naturally so I don't worry as much.

I just don't see him using an eyelash curler. I wouldn't use one myself, to be honest - mascara is much easier in my mind.
  #34  
Old 05-15-2013, 02:30 PM
DocCathode DocCathode is offline
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There have been times and places where men commonly wore makeup. Didn't the upper class men of France wear make up for a century or two before the revolution?

But, I don't see it happening in America anytime in the near future.

Re Purses

I've noticed a lot of men in my age group carry backpacks. I carry a Timberland. It serves every function of a purse (and more!), but I insist it is NOT a purse.
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Old 05-15-2013, 02:44 PM
Nava Nava is offline
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The article mentions "$5 billion on men’s grooming products", so that probably means men's deodorant, shaving cream, after shave face cream and some hair product aimed specifically at men. I think there are also far more shower gels and shampoos marketed towards men now.

A pretty far cry from make up.
And depending on local legal definitions, "cosmetics" includes such things as toothpaste.

Promise, my current client makes toothpaste and it's classified as cosmetics. I'm reasonably sure their kids' line of toothpaste, mouthwash and brushes with licensed pictures doesn't count as makeup, though.

Last edited by Nava; 05-15-2013 at 02:45 PM.
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Old 05-15-2013, 02:55 PM
Blackberry Blackberry is offline
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Serious question: Why?
Besides keeping eyelashes out of your eyes, I think it just makes such a difference in how your eyes look. I don't wear mascara because I don't like it flaking off and my lashes are long and thick anyway, but you'd hardly even notice them if I didn't curl them. It wouldn't look weird for men to do it either because a lot of men have naturally curled up lashes.
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Old 05-15-2013, 03:06 PM
MeanOldLady MeanOldLady is offline
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Dude, people whose eyelashes don't curl up get poked by them in their eye? That has literally never occurred to me, and I'm not even sure how that works.
  #38  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:09 PM
drewtwo99 drewtwo99 is offline
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Dude, people whose eyelashes don't curl up get poked by them in their eye? That has literally never occurred to me, and I'm not even sure how that works.
My eyelashes grow pretty much straight outwardly with very little curl, and I can't really remember getting poked too many times in the eye either. So I agree.

That being said, I'm a gay man who also doesn't wear any make up, but I'm not violently opposed to it like some guys are. I think the tinted moisturizer linked above actually looks quite nice on men.
  #39  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:16 PM
billfish678 billfish678 is offline
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I just carry an obviously woman's purse and try to look awkward like I am holding it for the SO and she is somewhere nearby.

Works all the time.

Last edited by billfish678; 05-15-2013 at 03:16 PM.
  #40  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:25 PM
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I would absolutely carry a purse as it's one of the few things I envy about women's fashion. It's such a practical thing; pockets are way too limiting, but man-purse stigma is still a thing. (I know at least one guy who carries his laptop bag everywhere even though he almost never carries a laptop in it- it's because of man-purse stigma.)

Make-up is another thing entirely. While I do continually tell myself that I need to start moisturizing and doing more skin care to avoid looking like Leatherface in my 50s, NOT having to wear actual makeup is one of my favorite things about being male. On an off day- shower/shirt/shorts/I'm out the door, be it to the movies or grocery shopping or dinner with friends, doesn't matter. Plus, I have naturally really big red lips so lipstick would make me look like John Wayne Gacy in his clown drag.

Last edited by Sampiro; 05-15-2013 at 03:26 PM.
  #41  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:33 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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As for the OP, I've seen a few "look at me" college kid types (Goth, Glam, punk, etc.- those whose "look" borders on costume) wearing guyliner and some other cosmetics, but it's far from mainstream. In fact, I was at "The Gay Starbucks" in Atlanta the other night and the dominant look among the young and hot openly gay set is almost Mormon missionary- cleancut, short hair, preppie attire- no makeup in the lot did I see. I don't even think it's a matter of being socially acceptable or 'un'- it's just not in.

Last edited by Sampiro; 05-15-2013 at 03:34 PM.
  #42  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:39 PM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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Dude, people whose eyelashes don't curl up get poked by them in their eye? That has literally never occurred to me, and I'm not even sure how that works.
I don't know how it happens. I never would have believed it if I hadn't SEEN his lashes, point-first, in his eye. They are like fucking little knives. As I said, they have actually penetrated my skin, too.

So he is ethnically Chinese and his nose is somewhat flat...so he can't wear his glasses far away from his face. And the glasses push the hairs in, too.
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Old 05-15-2013, 03:39 PM
MeanOldLady MeanOldLady is offline
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I would absolutely carry a purse as it's one of the few things I envy about women's fashion. It's such a practical thing; pockets are way too limiting, but man-purse stigma is still a thing. (I know at least one guy who carries his laptop bag everywhere even though he almost never carries a laptop in it- it's because of man-purse stigma.)
Murses are on the rise! On the ride to work, more guys are carrying things than not, so much so that I recently realized it actually now looks odd to me when the guys aren't carrying anything. Usually it's a messenger bag or a tiny bag/case for tablets and miscellany, so rejoice that everyone now carries so much stuff around that man bags are no longer to be mocked! Tell your coworker that he can stop with the laptop-free laptop bag now. (And if he ever actually needs to carry a laptop, a lot of super stylish messenger bags come with built in laptop and tablet slots. Sensible fashion, ftw!)
  #44  
Old 05-15-2013, 03:54 PM
Furious_Marmot Furious_Marmot is offline
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If men start wearing makeup, it will take twice as long to get out of the house in the morning. Think of the lost productivity!

I keep trying to get my wife to not wear it: "Extra sleep, more money, what's not to love?". She's not buying into it.
  #45  
Old 05-15-2013, 04:13 PM
DiosaBellissima DiosaBellissima is offline
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I keep trying to get my wife to not wear it: "Extra sleep, more money, what's not to love?". She's not buying into it.
Maybe she actually enjoys makeup.
  #46  
Old 05-15-2013, 04:36 PM
wheresmymind wheresmymind is offline
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The article mentions "$5 billion on men’s grooming products", so that probably means men's deodorant, shaving cream, after shave face cream and some hair product aimed specifically at men. I think there are also far more shower gels and shampoos marketed towards men now.

A pretty far cry from make up.
Yeah, when I read that I thought of things like gel/pomade, shaving cream and aftershaves, deodorant, etc. Even razors could be considered a "men's grooming product." Just because men don't paint their faces, it doesn't mean we don't spend a few bucks cleaning, shaving, and making ourselves look and smell good.

And if you take $5 billion and divide it by the 120 million or so adult men in the US it only comes out to 30-40 bucks per person per year. A few sticks of deodorant, a few things of shaving cream and aftershave (all of which are marketed specifically towards men), some men's body wash and shampoo, and maybe some moisturizer or sunscreen would probably come out to pretty close to that amount. I'm sure the market for real makeup for men is a tiny sliver of that $5 billion.

Last edited by wheresmymind; 05-15-2013 at 04:38 PM.
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Old 05-15-2013, 04:45 PM
Malthus Malthus is offline
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I've carried a lunch bag with books, my lunch, my umbrella, etc. for years. Never knew I was cutting edge!

As for make-up - no, that's not happening, absent a major social shift.
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:19 PM
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Yeah, not feeling the love for man-purses. Not that I think it would be too feminine or anything, but because I prefer being hands- (and shoulder-) free. Backpacks are tolerable because they put the load on both shoulders, but not purses.

Maybe I wouldn't feel this way if I hadn't carried a duffle bag or one of those "trendy" one strap backpacks as a kid in school. But purses are not my thing, and I marvel that even women can stand to carry them. Everything I carry can fit in my pockets. (And I used the aforementioned backpack when I was carrying a laptop.) Yeah, it may not look fashionable, but it feels better.
  #49  
Old 05-15-2013, 05:37 PM
Mijin Mijin is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 7,628
ISTM that it has been an aim of the beauty industry to target men for some time, and double their profits. It has been interesting to see this play out.

One way of accomplishing this is to sell the idea that using such products is macho. So you get adverts where some muscular guy is punching a punch bag then talking about how he's too tough...to show signs of ageing.

The other thrust has been to convince guys that it is what all the other guys are doing. You don't want to be a loner, do you?

Eventually though I think they will get their way: not that men will wear make-up (or that men will ever spend as much on such products as women do), but that things like moisturizing will become the norm. The need for men to tough guys has generally gone down over much of the developed world (American culture lags a bit on this), and looking good has become proportionally more important.

Last edited by Mijin; 05-15-2013 at 05:39 PM.
  #50  
Old 05-15-2013, 06:42 PM
Steophan Steophan is offline
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Location: Nottingham
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I've known plenty of men who wear make-up, although none of them would exactly be called mainstream in style. It's certainly common in gay and alternative music subcultures.
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