Bridge To Terabithia

I was looking for a different book when I came across BtT up in the attic on saturday, and read it yesterday for the first time in oh, 17 years. (I’m 33.)

I was crying at the end.

Books don’t do that to me.

Ever.

This one does.

I cried Sunday and I know I cried 17 years ago, as well as nearly every other time I’ve read it.

Truly a classic.

But…has there every been a TV movie/Afterschool special adaptation of this?

It seems to me that it would be a can’t miss proposition.

Thoughts?

Catcalls?

Anyone care to call me a sissy for being 33 and crying over a young adult book?

Well, I’m only 31 and tried to read this to my son. Couldn’t see through the tears.

And you’re still a sissy. :stuck_out_tongue:

BtT was the first book that ever made me cry back in fourth grade I guess, I mean really cry and be upset. I’ll admit it. I don’t think I would cry if I read it today though. I don’t seem to be able to cry much anymore. But then again, I’m not a sissy. {D&R}

I believe they are in the process of making a movie for it. Check out here for a 1985 version. I can’t seem to find anything about the new one. But IIRC Alyson Hannigan (Buffy’s sidekick) is cast as Leslie. But isn’t she a little old for the part?

I’m sure I heard they’re doing a new adaptation for it, but there’s no entry at imdb…but they yanked the entry for batman:year one recently, so I don’t know what that means in terms of their being one in talks or not. They might just be only posting for movies in production now or something like that.

I reread BtT last week, I cried too. I have an excuse though, I’m a girl. :stuck_out_tongue:

Katherine Paterson has a knack for creating characters you care for and putting them into believable situations. Among modern children’s book authors, only Jerry Spinelli and Laurence Yep come close. Bridge to Terabithia is one of her best, though I think The Great Gilly Hopkins and Jacob Have I Loved are better. Lyddie is almost in the same league, and has her most compelling character at its center. Park’s Quest, Come Sing Jimmy Joe, and Flip Flop Girl are all also good, if a step down. Her translations of Japanese stories are worth the read, but are, like those listed above, a little more distant emotionally than the first few listed.

One thing that I find interesting about Bridge to Terabithia is that Paterson, a devout Christian missionary, made the atheist in her book the most intelligent, articulate character.

I’m a twenty-nine year old male, and I can’t read this book without sobbing by the end. The scene between Jesse and his father at the creekbank gets me every time. I own two copies – one I loan out, the other I keep, because I can never tell when I’ll want to read it again.

For me, this book is a reminder of the difference one person can make in the life of another. Jesse’s life was made immensely more positive because of the influence of Leslie. That’s a message I never get tired of hearing. (That’s also why Titanic – though reviled by some – was a moving moviegoing experience. Not nearly as memorable as reading BtT, but memorable just the same.)

I’ve read several of the Katherine Paterson books mentioned. Another one I truly enjoyed was The Master Puppeteer. Not as moving as BtT, but masterful storytelling, nonetheless.

The only other book that does this to me is “A Summer To Die” Lois Lowry.

I vaguely recollect seeing a movie of this, though nothing moves me as much as the book. I recommended it to a coworker who hadn’t read it and she confessed that she finished reading it, sobbing, on the Metro.

Oh, and I second the recommendation of “A Summer to Die”. Best story ever of sibling love & rivalry.

Oh, I haven’t read Bridge to Terabithia in years. I’m gonna have to go dig up my copy now. :slight_smile:
Nope, you are definitely not a sissy–I’m 29 and the last time I read it ( a few years ago) I recall crying by the end too and I’ve read it quite a few times.
Tuck Everlasting gets to me too. I am reading it with my daughter right now and I’m interested in seeing how the new movie version stands up to the book.

I re-read Bridge to Terabithia last weekend as well. I was holed up in bed getting over a cold, and my wife had a copy lying around (she teaches the book regularly in her class). I was all misty by the end… but I know I’m a sissy, so no biggie.

I also read Tuck Everlasting later the same day, another book my wife uses in class often. It was the first time I had read it.

What a wonderful pair of books. I love them both.

I know there is a musical version (not on the screen, but on the stage) which I have not seen.

i read this book when i was in the 2nd grade and cried myself to sleep. my brother, who read it before me, cried himself to sleep for 3 nights in a row after finishing the book. so of course, we thought it was a good book.

but when i was in college, i came across a list of the ten most banned books, and BtT was on the list.
see http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/People/spok/most-banned.html
(listing BtT as #6)
and http://www.ala.org/bbooks/top100bannedbooks.html
(listing BtT as #9)

now, i realize these are hardly scientific polls, and that the reasons for banning any book are typically rather . . . uh, cryptic. but for the life of me, i couldn’t think of anything objectionable in this book other than the fact that it causes the room to get extremely dusty near the end. admittedly, i haven’t read the book in something like 20 years, so my memory is a bit hazy. Number 6 has mentioned that it included an atheistic character, which may provide the basis for objection. anybody else know why this book is so frequently an object of scorn?

mattymillhouse,

A few possibilities for why NtT is banned so much:

  1. The whole “female empowerment” thing with Leslie being faster then all the boys.

  2. Leslie’s parents being quasi-hippies.

  3. The whole “make-believe” thing about Terabithia. I’ll bet you dollars to donuts some nutjub fundie connected it with D&D and we all know how D& D is Satan’s tool for luring young people into his service.:rolleyes: :rolleyes:

PRNYouth,

Yeah, the scene with Jessie and his father at the creek is…I don’t know, on the one hand it’s so awful, but it feels TRUE, and beautiful. If that makes any sense.

Paterson wrote an extremely good book about writing for children, called either The Spying Heart or _ My Spying heart_. Extremely interesting stuff in there about censorship and writing for children and young adults.

A wonderful book. I have taught it to 5th and 6th grade students and they love it–the boys as well as the girls.

A group of students came to me once and wanted me to punish, or at least chastise, a girl on the bus because she TOLD THE ENDING to another girl who had just begun reading the book. It pleased me that they valued the story so much they wanted others to experience it and its emotional punch as intended.

SPOILERS

The main objections to the story come primarily from fundamentalist Christians, and they have to do with Leslie being an atheist who engages in “pagan rituals” with Jesse in the woods, and which Jesse is ready to indoctrinate his youngest sister into at the end.

Another recommendation for this fine book. I would say, however, that Paterson’s Jacob Have I Loved is the best children’s book dealing with sibling love and rivalry.

SPOILERS

The main objections to the story come primarily from fundamentalist Christians, and they have to do with Leslie being an atheist who engages in “pagan rituals” with Jesse in the woods, and which Jesse is ready to indoctrinate his youngest sister into at the end.

Another recommendation for this fine book. I would say, however, that Paterson’s Jacob Have I Loved is the best children’s book dealing with sibling love and rivalry.

Re the banning of BtT, the American Library Association lists it at number 9 on the top 100 banned/challenged books 1990-2000: http://www.ala.org/bbooks/top100bannedbooks.html

There was a movie made for Wonderworks on PBS. I remember watching it as a child, maybe fifteen years ago. A lot of those old Wonderworks movies are available on video, but I don’t know about this one.

I loved that show. Watched it every week.