Candidate with a past

It’s the year 2020, and Joe or Jane Gladhand is running for office…say, state representative. Turns out that s/he , as a teenager in the 90s, was a gang member. But s/he got out before s/he was corrupted beyond redemption, found God or was at any rate enlightened, fought hir way through school, ventured into politics, and has now atoned for all hir past sins, and wants to help today’s youth resist crime, drugs and violence. Would this candidate have a chance? (S/he never killed anyone, and is now utterly clean and sober.)

Remember, I’m pulling for you; we’re all in this together.
—Red Green

Oh yeah… she definitely would have a chance… growing up the way she did at least she would have a clue… which most politicians dont… Im wondering if they ever look out their glass house windows into the life of reality. Plus by the time that year rolls around… all the WWF guys will have retired


We are, each of us angels with only one wing;
and we can only fly by
embracing one another

What, you never heard of Al d’Amato ?

Fuhgedaboudit.

Would he or she have a chance of getting elected? Absolutely.

Would he or she have a chance of getting any respect from cynics? No.

Would he or she have a chance of getting through a press conference without being asked the same nosy questions over and over again on the subject? No.

Would he or she have a chance of changing perceptions about whether or not a person with a checkered past is redeemable through a virtuous present and future? Doubtful.

Condemning politicians is a national passtime. It makes us feel good about ourselves to mentally trap our politicians in our own little “original sin” judgements. It also - and this is very important - releases us from the pesky tedium of learning about our political system and fulfilling our duties as voters.

Sorry, I guess I went off on a tangent. My personal opinion? Reformed gang members would make great lawmakers. They know the bad crap that kids can get into, and they know how to get out of it.

He would only have a chance at running for office AFTER he was corrupted beyond redemption.

Taking money from crack dealers, taking money from tobacco companies… is there really a difference ?

“Politicians aren’t born. They are excreted”
–Cicero , about 2100 years ago

All right; I should have said, “before s/he becomes a hardened criminal and loses the ability to function in everyday society.” And, since I know someone is going to pounce on the “hardened criminal” classification, does anyone know of an elected official or candidate who did commit a crime, before seeking office?


Remember, I’m pulling for you; we’re all in this together.
—Red Green

I have it on very good authority that one of the elected members of the school board in Toledo, Ohio stole a pack of gum when he was eleven years old. Does that count?

Do they have to have been convicted (certain mayors come to mind) ? What about civil penalties, as opposed to criminal, or for that matter misdemeanors ? (quite a few politicians who got re-elected anyway)


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