Conversation length

Just saw an interesting psychology article about conversation length. Apparently, when two people talk, both parties are happy with the length of the conversation a mere 2% of the time. Both wish the conversation could go on for longer 10% of the time. Much more commonly, one or both people think the conversation should have been shorter.

I would guess Covid has made this much worse, and that this data predates Covid.

I would also guess people like to hear themselves talk and are often terrible judges of assuming how much others want to listen.

One must wonder, in cases where both parties agreed that the conversation should be longer/shorter, why wasn’t it?

I’m done. :rofl:

Both people wanted the last word - longer than desired conversation
Someone pulled the fire alarm - shorter than desired conversation.

The actual study asked people if during the conversation they thought there was an earlier point at which the conversation should have ended.

Conversations were probably longer than desired because it is unwise to tell the boss to shut up; and impolite to tell ones friends that they have talked about themselves quite enough, and without quite the personal fluency or wit residing in the perpendicular pronoun.

I’d imagine it’s all about power imbalance. The one in the lower position almost always wants a talk to end sooner.

Is this gonna be a long thread?

mmm

Already is.

Do you have a link to the article?

Why won’t you let a person get a word in edgewise? Jeez!!!

Oh, like you never pulled the fire alarm just to end a conversation.

i cannot find an online link to the brief article in this month’s Psychology Today. So here is an older article of middling relevance.

From the article:

In a poster at a recent meeting of Society for Judgment and Decision Making

I wonder if they ever have an open bat at these get togethers. Imagine the possibilities.

“Before the next talk, for the next twenty minutes, all shots are fifty cents”.

It’s always the other guy trying to shorten their conversations with me