For those who are job hunting...

I know many of us are now in the job market. I saw the following on MSN and really liked it: 2 Minute Drill

As a manager who went through the search process last fall, I can tell you that many of the candidates could have benefited from the article. I hope it helps!

No offense intended but this is pretty much First Job Interview 101 info here. I’m more concerned about the number of people who didn’t know this?

No offence taken. Actually, I’m secure enough to be hard to offend.

First Job Interview 101? Maybe, but as I said I did the search thing last fall and was amazed at how many people didn’t seem to know these things. That was why I passed this stuff on. If you know it, all the better.

But I had people show up in jeans… .

I had one guy the review team called “crazy eyes” 'cause he didn’t seem to be able to look us in the eye…

and I had one guy that I just couldn’t hear…

It was a senior position, people with 10 years or more experience in the field, so I would have expected everyone to know “First Job Interview 101.” Since I saw so very many who were missing it, I thought I’d pass it on.

The stuff in this article is extremely basic. It doesn’t even mention the key step of researching the company with which you’re interviewing. There’s a lot better articles out there, for example, this one seems OK: http://www.quintcareers.com/job_interview_preparation.html .

Well everyone is different. I know that having gone through the hiring process in the last 6 months I found that the original article would be useful. Perhaps during your hiring process you feel the second one is better.

I’m not sure that I agree with all the advice there, but lets face it, not everyone will be facing me in an interview. And the point of the thread is to help our fellow SDMB bretheren.

Twice they say “Do not ask about salary or benefits.” I disagree. We all are in it for the job satisfaction - but we all want to know what we will be paid. It is not wrong to ask.

The follow-up thank you is over hyped in my opinion. Maybe it is only my profession, but if you haven’t impressed me at the interview, no thank you will make a difference (however, it won’t ruin your chances either, so if you get a manager with a different temperment than mine, well, it didn’t cost much to do.)

I do like:

but both of the complaints here have been that the original article is too basic - and if showing up on time isn’t basic I don’t know what is.

Yep. That is still good, no matter which article you read… but maybe they state it better.

I think any and all advice is useful when job hunting. Interviewing is not something people do often, since most people don’t switch jobs every week. So it is always good to refresh oneself on the basics. It’s simply amazing how underestimated interpersonal skills are, especially in scientific and technical fields. Assuming they are qualified, someone who interviews well can steal a lot of good jobs in those areas from the often-nerdy competition. (It’s a lot harder to stand out in things like PR, the entertainment industry, etc.)

I worked with a guy once who used to run a job training program. He said it amazed him how often he had to teach people things like “Shower before the interview. Shave. Don’t drink alcohol before you arrive.”

I think any and all advice is useful when job hunting. Interviewing is not something people do often, since most people don’t switch jobs every week. So it is always good to refresh oneself on the basics. It’s simply amazing how underestimated interpersonal skills are, especially in scientific and technical fields. Assuming they are qualified, someone who interviews well can steal a lot of good jobs in those areas from the often-nerdy competition. (It’s a lot harder to stand out in things like PR, the entertainment industry, etc.)

I worked with a guy once who used to run a job training program. He said it amazed him how often he had to teach people things like “Shower before the interview. Shave. Don’t drink alcohol before you arrive.”