Guitar in "American Grafitti"

I’m watching “American Grafitti,” and Flash Cadillac and the Continentals are playing the hop. Pretty sure that’s a 70’s era Stratocaster.

Got a link? If there’s a big headstock you’re correct.

ETA: checked YouTube - yep; big headstock. (don’t know how to paste a link on my iPad).

You get your first good look about 20 seconds in…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=219AydgdgHM&feature=youtube_gdata_player

That big headstock gave it away. The last time I saw AG was in the theatre (before I started playing).

It’s listed in the goofs on IMDb for the movie. Said to be post-1966.

Quite a few anachronisms listed, but not all are included, especially with regard to some musical references.

Set in 1962, released in 1973. Almost 40 years have passed. Geez, I’m old.

…and the Shure ball style microphones with XLR connectors didn’t exist at the time!

(This really is nit-picky.)

Sir, I applaud your geekiness.

Guitars and their use and/or portrayal in movies is all over the map. I remember watching this movie my wife loves, Dan in Real Life with Steve Carell, Juliette Binoche, and Dane freakin’ Cook (overall a not-bad grown-up chick flick). Anyway, Cook’s character pulls out a guitar. Hey that’s a Gibson J-45*; that’s a great guitar!

:smack: I am a geek.

*bonus points if you also see that Jimmie Fallon plays a more-bling-than-a-J-45 Gibson SJ in that Capital One ad - until he breaks it; then they hand him the Epiphone version…:wink:

Is that an SM58? I can’t tell for sure cough, but, yeah, if it is, that was mid-60s (1966, according to Wikipedia.) I’m amazed by anyone catching that level of detail.

One of these days I’m going to shoot a Western, and have a guy playing a Telecaster in a saloon. :cool:

What did they use then? I can’t remember, was it 1/4 inch phone plugs?

They had a 3 pin male plug that was about the size of a DIN connector, with a threaded ring to hold it on. You can see one in this video about the history of the Shure model 55.

My Sennheiser gold 409 has a similar connector.

It looks like a Shure Unidyne 565SD. The most popular microphone connector of the time was an Amphenol MC3M

You mean like Zachariah? (I think Joe is playing a strat but it’s the same concept, right? :D)

Speaking of goofs, if you look closely you can clearly see those are Dean Markley guitar strings, and as you probably are aware, Mr. Markley didn’t even start selling strings until the early seventies.

:slight_smile:

Probably should start a different thread on geeky stuff you notice, but I watched Jagger on SNL recently and they spoofed American Idol, with Jagger as Steven Tyler (funny) and Fred Armisen as guest judge Carlos Santana. Armisen is a total music geek and sure enough his Carlos was sporting a Santana-correct PRS guitar. Pretty funny inside-baseball thing to see.

There have been threads like that before. Even a meta-thread where the question is why do people notice and care about these things?

The big problem is that the people who don’t notice goofs think that there is “something wrong” with people who do notice these things and somehow think that noticing errors reduces the enjoyment of a movie or program when quite the opposite is true (at least for me). Trying to get those people to see things from another person’s point of view is impossible.

E.g., we recently watch the extended “Brunch Special” edition of the Season 2 finale of Portlandia. One thing I had noticed in the original is that there had been a tall woman standing in line behind the main characters who disappeared later in the episode. It turns out, she was part of a deleted running gag and the extended version explained exactly what happened to her.

(Me: “Hey, I had noticed that she just disappeared in the original …” Mrs. FtG: “Of course you did.”, smiles.)

Now, is getting the answer to the mystery cool or what? Well, not to others. They think there’s something wrong with me for noticing it in the first place and that clearly I must not be enjoying the show as much as them.

Hey, people have hobbies, are experts on certain things (like guitar models) and can pick up on things. Good for them, no need for putting people down.

The thing that most annoys me in a film is where the actor is attempting to use a tool, and obviously has no idea how the tool is even held. Pretty much only Harrison Ford in Witness used tools well, and that was because he earned a living as a carpenter to pay the bills early in his career.

The Buddy Holly Story from 1978 had quite a few guitar goofs.

I saw this. I’m glad he didn’t have the sense to smash a really nice instrument.

Hey, don’t be hating on the Epi. :slight_smile: