Organ donation

Is it true that a majority of MDs refuse to register as organ donors, because doing so may compromise the care they receive at the end of their lives?

I’ve never heard this story, but it certainly sounds ridiculous AND inflammatory. My guess is that it is just the opposite: medical professionals are MORE likely to have filled out their donor cards because they see the benefits of organ donation on a nearly daily basis.


Jess

Full of 'satiable curtiosity

If there’s a reason doctors and other health professional don’t sign organ donor cards, it may be because as health professionals they are exposed to more things that would make their organs not fit for transplantion.

In a similar vein, health professionals are asked not to donate blood. This includes doctors, nurses, and technicians.

your humble TubaDiva

{{{Is it true that a majority of MDs refuse to register as organ donors, because doing so may compromise the care they receive at the end of their lives? }}}—KenP

Back in the 80’s a friend of mine worked as an EMT. He told me that their instructions with regard to unconscious victims at the scene of an accident were as follows:

Secure identification from the individuals’ effects.

If the individual is determined to be an organ donor, set them aside.

Render care to all other non-donor victims.

Render care to donor victims who are still alive.

While I had difficulty in believing this, as I still do, I have indicated my donor status in separate legal paperwork–not on my Driver’s License.

Ok, I read COMA, and maybe part of me believes it… just a little bit.

Kalél
(The Original EnigmaOne)
Common ¢ for all ages.

I don’t know about setting them aside. My understanding is that they don’t care who you are or if you are a donor they only care about the extent of your injuries. I thought they always took the worst case first and then down the line. If someone is obviously dead or close then they would move on. That’s just how I understand it so I don’t know if that’s true or not.

I’m an organ donor since once I’m dead I don’t really care if they hang my body on a pole. I’m dead and no longer need it. One note though, if you are a donor, let your family know or they can put the kibosh on the whole thing.

You can count the number of apples in one tree but never the number of trees in one apple.

C’mon folks. Let’s not spread these really destructive rumors that just cause people to avoid organ donation.
That is total, 100% crap about EMTs being instructed to put organ donors aside and assist non-donors. The EMTs don’t even know, or care, that you’re an organ donor because they don’t go rifling through your wallet stuffed with ATM slips and old library cards until they’ve already started to render aid. If you’re spurting blood, they’re going to stop that instead of looking for a card that gives them permission to just step back and watch you die.
It sounds to me like you’re confusing this with triage, in which some victims who are too far gone to help, are “set aside” in a mass casualty incident so that meaningful help can be rendered to others. It has nothing whatsoever to do with organ donation.
I work with a lot of doctors and other med professionals, and they’re donors.
By the way, Byzantine makes an important point in suggesting you talk to your family about donation. Merely signing a donor card does not give the doctor permission to take your organs; it only indicates that you wanted them to. Your next of kin still has legal control over whether they can or not, so you should make your wishes clear to them.
– Greg, Atlanta

The only thing an EMT is going to look for at the scene is a medicalert tag. An important point in debunking this sort of bullshit is knowing the different types of organ donation. Certain tissues, such as skin and retinas, can be harvested after death, but things like the heart, liver, kidneys and lungs are taken from patients that are declared brain dead, but are still maintained on lifesupport in the ICU. It takes at least 12-24 (after said declaration) hours for the transplant team to arrive and the recipients (usually in other cities) to check into their hospitals and other logistics. A variety of tests are performed for HIV, hepatitis, type and crossmatch of tissues. I’ve cared for and observed potential organ donor patients and they recieve the same care as everyone else! Another thing to know, is that end of their life patients are rarely donors, they look for young, otherwise healthy traura pts.

Tubadiva:
most of the professional I know are organ donors, and I have never heard of or been asked not to donate blood.
Larry, RN ER/PICU

My mother is a former ER nurse in Georgia; one of my friends is a technician in the coroner’s office in Louisiana. They both told me they were asked not to give blood.

That’s what I based my posting on. Obviously different places, different rules.

your humble TubaDiva

Were they asked because of specific exposures or on general principles? The latter would be outside my experience in California,
Larry

In actuality, health professionals are a great source of blood donations. We’ll be having our Summer Blood drive next week and anticipate close to 100 participants. Healthcare workers, while exposed to potentially infectious body fluids, are also trained to take pains to protect themselves froms those risks. Additionally, a lot of know our health histories pretty well and understand the fact that blood is a precious commodity that has no equal; when you need it, you gotta have it.

(I must admit, I don’t donate at our blood drive, but prefer to go to a local children’s hosp. instead. Why? I like their surroundings, the fact that a kid will gwt my blood and, most importantly, they serve Mrs. Fields cookies (warm) as post-donation snacks. Mercenary)

Germ Boy said :(I must admit, I don’t donate at our blood drive, but prefer to go to a local children’s hosp. instead. Why? I like their surroundings, the fact that a kid will gwt my blood and, most importantly, they serve Mrs. Fields cookies (warm) as post-donation snacks. Mercenary)

I avoid Red Cross donations for similar reasons. I prefer the Fairfax Hospital/INOVA donation centers. They have the comfy wave chairs (RC has flat gurneys), better snacks, and their techs are nicer. One time they even had a pizza party; they had Pizza Hut delivering fresh pizzas all day for the donors.

But being an O-neg person is kinda spooky. When I mention my type, whoever hears it kinda drools. I’m almost afraid they’ll kidnap me and force me to be a perpetual donor. :slight_smile:

I wish that I could be a donor. I have indicated that I would like to be on my drivers license, but most likely I won’t be accepted. Had Hepititus A when I was 12, result of spending to much time in one of the local creeks. Still it would be nice if maybe something might be useable.

Germ boy, maybe you can answer this one, My understanding is that if I had been a year or so younger, I’d be able to give blood and donate now. Is this true, I’m curious as to the reasons why if it is.


>>Being Chaotic Evil means never having to say your sorry…unless the other guy is bigger than you.<<

—The dragon observes