POLL, CA VOTERS ONLY: Why Arnold?

This is a thread for California voters who voted for Arnold Schwarzenegger.

  1. Why did you vote for him?

  2. How did you vote on the recall question?

  3. What is your registed political party?

Thank you.

Also, please post your credit card numbers, ssn and street addresses.

[crickets]Chirp…chirp…chirp…[/crickets]

It seems they’re too embarassed to admit it. Or hung over.

It’ll give him a leg-up on the presidential elections.

Well, from my personal experience at the polls he nailed the “I’ve Never Bothered to Vote for Anything Before in My Life, But This is Like Totally Hilarious, Dude” demographic.*

*Based on the conversation of the two guys in line in front of me.

  1. Bread and circuses.

  2. Yes. Gray Davis is a (+)$&#*@.

  3. Republican.

  1. Mc Clintock wasn’t going to win.

Bustamante refuses to distance himself from the MECHA slogan of “for the race everything, for those outside, nothing.” This sounds like it was written by the KKK, and just adopted by brown people. Bustamante also tried to say that the power crisis in CA had something to do with the deficits, which is ridiculous.

Davis started new taxes to cover his shortfall that he created. Being a good Democrat, when he saw money a few years ago, he spent it all, and planned on the party never stopping. Being a bad Democrat, he covered his butt in large part by increasing taxes on the people who could least afford it, on something that they absolutely needed to continue their jobs.

Davis actually allowed for illegal aliens to get the only form of legal picture ID that most people even have. This has seriously got to be one of the most asnine ideas I’ve ever heard. No one I know can even try to explain the point, other than sucking up to the Latino vote. Fact: thumb prints were to be taken when giving this unknown person a perfectly valid state ID, but the print wasn’t going to be attached to the name in any database. Davis never even tried to justify this decision at all during the campaign that I ever heard, and I was paying attention.

You can tell that a campaign is in a bad spot when it runs ads like the one with Diane Feinstein, the night before the election:

“It’s unfair”. That’s so vague a personal judgement as to be completely unfalsifiable. Nothing I can say can argue against that, because it’s not an arguement itself. Also, I note that you’re not arguing that it’s illegal. You probably wish it were, but it’s not, and this is another case of very liberal people not liking democracy in action. There is a breed of liberal who subconciously doesn’t like it that the commoners can vote on things, unless they’re voting the way the liberal wants them to. Otherwise, they’re the unwashed masses, who don’t know any better, and have been led astray by the evil opposition, because you see, they’re feeble-minded sometimes, don’t you know.

“It’s bad for California.” Again, so vague as to not be an argument.

“Davis was fairly elected.” Not an issue. I’ve never heard anyone say that he wasn’t fairly elected. Apparently you can’t think of anything better to say. Oh, and your statement admits that statewide elections can and in fact very often have been fairly held using the very voting machines that Davis was suing over this time.

Davis had the nerve to stand next to Bill Clinton and say that a recall was the equivalent of an impeachment, and should only be used for crimes and such. No, Gray, a person who should have a real handle on the difference between the nature of an impeachment and a recall is standing next to you. Why don’t you ask him what it is?

The fact is, you just don’t like the constitution allowing for the recall. Well, I guess that’s just too bad. I mean, it must suck for you, sure, but it’s perfectly legal, and you’re just going to have to suffer the outrage you’ve caused.

Oh, I heard this tidbit today, replayed from election day (paraphrased):

Jesse Jackson: There will be challenges to this outcome. So many people were diisenfranchised. There were 300,000 calls to (something) about (something). [He didn’t state how this was exactly supposed to prove that each of these people were “disenfranchised”]

Sean Hannity: So, if Davis wins, do you still challenge the election?

Pause.

JJ: No.

Because you see, “disenfranchised” voters are guaranteed to be voting Democrat, are simple minded, can’t be expected to take the time to check if their polling places have changed, and can’t be expected to punch a card or mark a box with accuracy. They can’t make it on their own, and need a person like JJ to take their hands and lead them for as long as he can make a living at it. The ACLU actually tried to argue in court that minority voters are more likely to be tired coming home from work, and be less likely to vote if their polling places have changed. Good Lord, people, how much can you hold the hands of grown adults?

Another point about people being “disenfranchised”: Almost half the Hispanic vote went against Davis. That’s a lot for a California Democrat. So just suck it up. Also, the turnout was the highest in something like 20 years, so if you’re going to argue that people were disenfranchised, I’m going to argue that somehow Republican white males were disenfranchised the last time Davis was elected. I mean, what other reason could there be for the turnout to be so bad, and go so Democrat?

I just tonight heard a guy say “This election was illegal.” That’s a quote, folks. His reason? He had to take the bus and walk to get to his polling place that was 4 miles away. That was his entire argument.

  1. I think you can guess how I voted.

  2. Republican.

I’ll beat someone to the punch and admit that one person is not necessarily representative of the entire group. I’d heard that kind of attitude more than once, and I gathered it was a somewhat common thing.

I voted for him, and was happy to do so.

Basically, I’m looking for these things in a candidate:
a) they can make things happen. I don’t want a Carter.
b) their views pretty much line up with my own.

On #a, he’s clearly a self-made man and has had big success in several areas of life. Yes, he’s had no political experience, but that doesn’t really bother me. I figure he’s the kind of guy who can figure out how the system works and dive in and make it happen. Plus, he’s clearly a very connected guy, able to pull Warren Buffett and others to his team.

On #b, he pretty much fits my views perfectly. I’m fiscally conservative and socially liberal, and so is he.

On your other question, I’m registered as a Republican.