Rediscovering obscure old songs from your youth

Which reminds me of another great old song: Gamma’s “Voyager”.

I reckon pretty much all of you have heard this, but you can’t remember the name or the artist, right?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0EL7fjfeE8

I can, but I live in Chicago, and the band is still well-known here, having re-formed 25 years ago.

I liked that song “Flagpole Sitta” by the band Harvey Danger and got their full album Where Have All The Merrymakers Gone? as one of my 10 CDs for a dollar or whatever from Columbia House. I don’t think it went in to my main rotation (you know, the 30 CDs you could fit in your CD wallet?) and I didn’t give the band much thought after that.

A few years ago I re-discovered the album, as well as the next two albums the band released. They are all great and I love them!

Sadly, I also found that the band had broken up just a few years before I re-discovered them. Bah.

Back in college in mid 70 time frame one late night DJ played every night a rock and roll version of “In the hall of the mountain king” by greig.

I never heard that song since, wish i could find.

Electric Light Orchestra did a version of it on their third album (released in 1973), which would fit that time frame. Is this it?

[quote=“casdave, post:22, topic:737234”]

I reckon pretty much all of you have heard this, but you can’t remember the name or the artist, right?

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I know the group’s name is The Ides of March. However, I think a lot of people initially thought it was Blood, Sweat, & Tears because the two groups sound a lot alike and BS&T was at the height of its popularity when “Vehicle” was released in 1970.

[quote=“casdave, post:22, topic:737234”]

I reckon pretty much all of you have heard this, but you can’t remember the name or the artist, right?

[/QUOTE]

That’s still played on the local oldies stations; however, I’m not all that far from Chicago either.

I recently ran across Ian Dury’s “Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick” again (the video was a bit controversial because Dury was wearing cut-off sleeves).

When I was around 6 or 7 years old, there was occasionally this song on the radio that I absolutely loved for some indescribable reason. I remember this time I was listening to it and I was utterly entranced, and my little sister ignorantly grabbed the dial on the radio and switched it to another station. I freaked out and begged my mother to get the song back, but she couldn’t find the station in time. She asked my father if he had that song in his LP collection, but, alas, he didn’t.

I didn’t hear that song again for a good 20 years or so. I had no idea who had sung or composed it. I could only vaguely remember the melody.

Then, one day a few years ago I was driving at night, and I had a classic rock station on, and Roy Orbison’s “You Got It” came on, and I realized that that was the song I’d loved and never quite been able to remember.

(I went through a slightly less traumatic experience forgetting and remembering the Who’s “Bargain” between when I heard it as a kid and rediscovered it as an adult.)

God I love Tim Curry!

Does he watch Family Guy? Quagmire does that refrain in response to gay marriage.

I listened to Rush’s Caress of Steel album a few weeks ago. That was a blast from the past!

An aside: Canadian TV often shows commercials for insurance (I think) for baby boomers that usually start off “If you can identify these [various pictures], you’re over 50,” or something like that. One of the pictures is the kind of plastic adaptor you speak of. I asked my 20-year-old daughter, who is generally pretty knowledgable about pop culture, if she knew what it was. She had no clue. The best she could come up with was “Some kind of symbol?”

Are you sure that’s the title? Not to nitpick, but Titanic was an RMS (Royal Mail Steamer), not a USS.

Is this the song (popular among some folk in 1912) about the black guy who survives the sinking of the ship?

In her defense, the adaptor they show does look sort of like a neon-green triskelion.

That is in fact the title… and it does use the old Leadbelly song “The Titanic” as a jumping-off point, referring to the fighter Jack Johnson, who (according to legend) was refused passage. But it’s more along the lines of “Alice’s Restaurant”, albeit more manic… an extended comic narrative presenting a fanciful explanation for why the ship hit that iceberg.

[quote=“kenobi_65, post:26, topic:737234”]

Electric Light Orchestra did a version of it on their third album (released in 1973), which would fit that time frame. Is this it?

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The Who did it but I think it came out as a bonus track later.

Brockett’s version is deliberately ahistorical – the ship sails from NY to the UK, for instance.

And I doubt you could lift 497 1/2 feet of rope. :wink:

You ain’t Jack Johnson!