The Perseids are coming

Anyone getting ready to view my Birthday meteor shower? It’s the only I can consistently remember …and nice weather for a predawn view…

but you’ll still be able to see the brightest meteors.

By the night of **Perseid maximum (Aug 12-13)**, the **92% illuminated Moon** will be on the **Aquarius/Pisces border** (closer to the Perseid radiant) and will still be rising before the end of evening twilight in the UK.
All is not lost however. The **Perseids are rich in bright meteors** and so many Perseids will still be seen. In addition, you can minimise the effect of the moonlight by **observing with your back to the Moon** - possibly  viewing the Cassiopeia/Cepheus/Ursa Minor area. If possible, **keep the Moon hidden** behind trees or a nearby building.
**Perseid maximum** is actually predicted for **Aug 13d00h UT **and so the **best observed rates** are likely to be seen **late in the night of Aug 12-13**. However **good rates** are also likely during the nights of Aug 10-11, 11-12 and 13-14, so don't just focus on the night of Aug 12-13 (and risk it being clouded out).
By the night of **Perseid maximum (Aug 12-13)**, the **92% illuminated Moon** will be on the **Aquarius/Pisces border** (closer to the Perseid radiant) and will still be rising before the end of evening twilight in the UK.
All is not lost however. The **Perseids are rich in bright meteors** and so many Perseids will still be seen. In addition, you can minimise the effect of the moonlight by **observing with your back to the Moon** - possibly  viewing the Cassiopeia/Cepheus/Ursa Minor area. If possible, **keep the Moon hidden** behind trees or a nearby building.
**Perseid maximum** is actually predicted for **Aug 13d00h UT **and so the **best observed rates** are likely to be seen **late in the night of Aug 12-13**. However **good rates** are also likely during the nights of Aug 10-11, 11-12 and 13-14, so don't just focus on the night of Aug 12-13 (and risk it being clouded out).

http://www.popastro.com/meteor/activity/activity.php?id_pag=228

We’re thinking of giving it a shot, but it looks like clouds are moving in on those days.

Unfortunately they’re difficult to see from the Southern Hemisphere.

Looking good weather wise…still doubt that anything could beet the Leonids storm a few years back

I also think of them as my birthday meteor shower though my birthday isn’t until the 27th.

Pops loved to go to Eastern Washington to view them, usually at a campground near the Grand Coulee Dam. Wide open skies and hot, dry weather. About five years ago, we tried a place about twenty miles north of Goldendale (where there’s a cool observatory just outside of town that’s open to the public in the evenings.) We saw quite a few meteors but, talking to some neighboring campers the following morning, the real show didn’t start until about 4 AM. Would like to check that place out again some time.

However, Pops passed away in January. Watching the Perseids won’t be the same without him.

Even with all the light pollution around here we can see a few meteors on a clear night. We went up into the mountains in CA to see them once, we saw about 10 large bright ones in about 2 hours, and smaller fainter lines every couple of minutes.

When I lived in California, this used to be a yearly event for me. I saw some good ones…

I, for one, welcome our new Persei 8 overlords.

Is that so? While the radiant is in Perseus, a northern constellation, I’ve found that meteors can be seen anywhere in the sky. When we go out we all look in different directions.

The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) hosts periodic “star parties”, usually when there is an interesting confluence or event. Members of a local astronomy club bring scopes and so does OMSI. Up until last night, the ones we went to were cancelled because of clouds.

But last night was very clear, and we joined a shitload of other people on a thousand foot hilltop to see the Perseids. We got there early, and found a spot at one of the few picnic benches provided. As we’re sitting there, a guy walks up and asks if we mind if he sets up his scope in the open area near us. Sure, why not. Dude proceeds to drag a 12" Orion Dobsonian out of his SUV and set it up, which I helped him with.

As darkness settled in, he took a shot on Vega to set up his program, and went to Saturn, which was low on the horizon. Fucking awesome. It’s at a 23 degree tilt and we could see Titan and one other moon. Also got to see the Hercules globular cluster.

I’ve seen the Perseids before and know what they look like: for the most part, it’s short streaks of light w-a-a-ay up there. But last night, before any other meteors were seen, a good-sized fireball streaked across the sky, leaving a trail that continued to glow for 5 seconds or longer after it burned out. Spectacular.