Tim Tebow ESPN football analyst. Good idea or not?

Here is his new job

Is this just pimping his popularity with sports loving evangelicals or does he really have the chops to be an analyst at this point?

Tebow was ignored when many teams needed a 3rd string quarterback during the NFL season. The only reason he got a look with the Patriots was to deflect the stories about a guy on trial for murder playing for the Patriots while Jesus loving Tebow was unemployed.

I don’t have any reason to think he’ll be a good commentator but these 4th string cable networks are usually on mute anyway in sports bars. Tebow can say the usual nonsense about a team, "Wanting it more. " and I could care less.

How much “chops” does he really need to be a talking head on the pregame show? His job is to show up on time and reasonably sober, hit his mark, and read his lines off the teleprompter.

My take on Tebow has always been: nice kid, great college QB, just didn’t have the tools to make it in the NFL. I rooted for him because I liked him, but I never thought he’d succeed.

As an analyst? Well, who knows? But my gut feeling is, he’ll be just another bland commentator who tells us nothing interesting or useful. I’d love to be wrong, but I don’t see him as a great analyst.

My take on Tebow has always been: nice kid, great college QB, just didn’t have the tools to make it in the NFL. I rooted for him because I liked him, but I never thought he’d succeed.

As an analyst? Well, who knows? But my gut feeling is, he’ll be just another bland commentator who tells us nothing interesting or useful. I’d love to be wrong, but I don’t see him as a great analyst.

Then again, when’s the last time Lee Corso, Mark May or Lou Holtz said anything really interesting or insightful?

You speaketh the Truth. Mark May in particular is just a terrible analyst.

As for Tebow, it’s funny to me that a guy who couldn’t ever figure out how to fix his own problems (mechanics, quick reads, etc) is now going to comment on others. Maybe it’s a “those that can’t do…” kind of thing. But at least he’ll be nice about it.

I’m not sure why we even need live analysts/commentators anymore. Just pre-record a bunch of exclamations and cliches, load them onto a soundboard, and play them at the appropriate moment (or completely at random; I’d venture very few people would even notice).

Sports video games do a passable job at this already, and if all of the effort were put into the commentary, I’m certain a reasonably believable “virtual sports commentator” could be created, with just as much “insight” as the live talking heads.

He isn’t even going to be working live games. Pre-game puffery can’t be that hard to do. He mostly has to look at the right camera when he talks–what little actual analysis is presented will be prepared by worker-bees off camera. Tebow will just be delivering the product.

His primary job at the SEC Network is essentially the equivalent of a local TV station hiring a onetime hometown hero to the pregame show panel. So it’s a win-win situation, he gets to stay connected to the sport as a regular job and the network gets, as the news release said, “an SEC icon” to draw viewers. The contract makes provision for his trying for another shot at a pro team. Plus who knows, he may grow into it. He can always pause to remind viewers too enthusiastic about some later hyped college star of how the Pros can make you humble.

If it had not been for the crazy hype, would he have been considered to have done badly? I mean, college star, then 3 seasons NFL, one season with a winning record as sort-of-regular QB, one playoff win, about $10 million in paychecks (so if he is or has a good money manager he’s decently set). I know I had *not *done any of that by the time I was 26, just sayin’. Sounds like a fair got-it-while-it-was-good, now move on with a regular life trip.

He was a great college player and did play in the NFL for a couple of seasons. I assume he must know something about the game, bad mechanics be damned.

Frankly, he can’t be any worse than most of the bozos on ESPn.

Do you think Ray Lewis, Shannon Sharpe, Deion Sanders, Mike Ditka, etc. were hired after a lengthy interview where they were asked to break down film and present a concise analysis accessible to the average viewer, and then network execs wrestled with whether or not they had “the chops?”

I expect Tebow to be excellent at: smiling when the red light comes on, saying obvious and stupid things, and correctly pronouncing most of the words he uses.

Is there any reason to think he’ll be any crappier at it than any other former player? As long as he keeps his religious beliefs out of it (and I don’t see why he wouldn’t), I don’t see this as necessarily a bad idea. It all depends on how good he is at it, and we won’t know this until we see him in action.

Well, you never know. Roger Staubach and Joe Montana were two of the greatest quarterbacks of all time, but they were TERRIBLE television commentators. Meanwhile, Trent Dilfer, a mediocre pro QB (despite his Super Bowl ring), is a very good TV commentator.

There’s no necessary connection between great ability on the playing field and great ability in a studio.

So Tim, who are you picking to win in the Alabama Georgia game?

Well, first and foremost I’d like to thank my personal Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for aiding me in correctly picking South Carolina in last week’s matchup.

I’ll agree Dilfer is an above average TV NFL analyst, but he should be kept as far as possible from commentating live games. The season opener MNF he did (Texans at Chargers) with Chris Berman should be all the evidence necessary for that, much less any of the other games he’s provided color for.

As for Tebow, I’ve never been high on his abilities as an NFL QB. But I don’t see any problem with having him in the studio. Give him a shot. I’ve not been really impressed the few times he’s done similar segments in the past, but it’s not I watch sports for the analysts, anyway. I wonder how they’re going to get around his somewhat high-pitched, breathy delivery, but maybe it won’t even be an issue.