Voynich manuscript finally deciphered?

According to Cheshire (and you). But no one else.

In other news, Nostradamus predicted WW2.

In medieval art, often size was used to indicate how important figures were. More important people were drawn as bigger. That’s assuming that the figures were drawn to plan rather than some being made smaller because the drafter was running out of room.

You could be right; this is not my level of expertise. But it is not out of line to say, “Cite?”

I’m mostly going by old art history classes.

That’s because he made the translation match what he tells you the picture represents!:smack: In most cases, there is no reason to assume the illustration is of what he says the word is. The whole thing is circular.

And actually, as I pointed out, in the case of the “children,” the words he transliterates 1) aren’t even temperaments. Since when are “buzzing,” “on the edge,” “cloudy,” “golden bird,” and “oiled” temperaments? 2) even though he chose words from three different languages spread over 2000 miles apart, the only way he can get the words to even vaguely to match temperaments is to imagine they are being used in outlandishly figurative ways.

You really don’t get this whole methodology thing, do you? :dubious:

It was common to illustrate more important people larger, as for example Edward the Confessor in the Bayeux Tapestry. In the Voynich illustration, the larger figures are wearing tiaras or some other headgear, and have much more elaborate hairdos, suggesting they may be noblewomen and the others lesser members of their court.

My favorite is where he claims that “life-force pots” means pregnant women.

I’ve been unable to find out the title of his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Bristol website or his own websites, which is distinctly odd. He only cites himself twice in his own article, both to articles listed as “preprints” and not actual publications. Many of the other references in his article also look rather dicey.

Pelling talks about his ideas in new comments today, starting here.
On a related topic, look in the comments from the blog entry I mentioned earlier for comments by Rick Sheeger: it has been noticed that “Richard Sheeger” is a perfect anagram for Gerard Cheshire, so you can add sock puppeteer to his resume.

Check out this hilarious comment from Sheeger/Cheshire:

Nm. Misread.

You’re not going back to that beloved of Fortean times pseudoscientist nutcases again, with his competing Manuscript book/theory?

The reason why I am not buying any of you other cites is because you haven’t conceded this Pelling guy is a total woo-woo nutcase.

A general rule of thumb in life for finding the right answer is to find the side that you are on and pick the opposite. I am just devastated at your disapproval.

Yeah, that’s totally rational.

You’re not going to increase Cheshire’s credibility, or your own, by attacking Pelling.

Why should anyone value your opinion until you concede that Cheshire’s ideas are total bullshit as well?

Because they haven’t been debunked yet by anyone but Pelling. And Pelling is a nutcase.

Of course Cheshire could be wrong, but I am not enough of a expert to say one way or the other.

I just debunked them.:dubious: And apparently you haven’t been following the commentary by other experts such as Fagin Davis.

As I said, you don’t have to be an expert in a field to detect bullshit argumentation. And if you’ve read all the commentary here so far, and other commentary on line besides Pelling’s, you have more than enough information to say he is wrong. And if you still can’t tell, that’s your problem, not a problem with your expertise.

Where was Fagan Davis cited here?

And sure, if you say so.

Maybe we have been too hard on ol’ Gerard–the mob might have his girlfriend!

She was cited in various links above, such as this one.

Lisa Fagin Davis, Executive Director of the Medieval Academy of America, actually is an expert in this field.

There’s plenty of other criticism by others, not just Pelling. Try reading some of the other links above, as well as links in the news stories about this. Reactions by experts have been uniformly negative (when they could keep from laughing), which is why the University of Bristol pulled their press release and distanced themselves from Cheshire.

Thanks for the acknowledgement. :cool: