White kids adopted by nonwhite families?

Probably a dumb question that came to me out of the blue the other day . . .

I’m sure that through either the media or personal experience, most of us know of white families who have adopted children who are Korean, or black, or some race that is not the same as the parents. I recall some Dopers telling stories that involved mentioning that their children are black and they are not.

So how common (or uncommon, for that matter) is it for non-white parents to adopt white children? Do you know of any such families? It just occurred to me that I’ve never heard of any, but I’m sure they must be out there.

[Steve Martin in The Jerk]

I was raised the only white child of a poor black sharecropper family.

[/SMiTJ]

I don’t know the statistics, but I do know of one black family who have an adopted white son. They were my next door neighbors in High School.

I thought it was “I was born a poor black child” or something like that.

But yeah, besides that one. :smiley: Like Lamar’s neighbors. Anybody else?

“You mean I’m gonna stay this color?!?”

Ahem. Sorry.

No, never heard of that before. kittenlm and I are just about to take our first steps towards adoption, and from what we’ve seen so far, white children available for adoption are few and far between. Never encountered a non-white family who adopted white.

We’re white parents who’ve adopted black and biracial children through a private adoption agency.

When we became licensed as state certified foster parents we began participating in foster parents support groups. IIRC, there was only one black family who had a white foster child, and that was as a result of the foster parents knowing the bio parents before the state became involved; therefore the placement was requested and approved.

On a comical note, the white childs hair was styled with black products and in a black style, much like my black daughter had her hair styled in a white hairstyle at the time <g>. Eventually, we both learned how to do our childrens hair in the manner it should be done culturally, but not before asking an awful lot of questions :slight_smile:

There’s an (American) football player who has the last name of Fujita, or something similar. I don’t remember what team he plays on, but I commented on his name when my dad was watching football (“I bet there aren’t a lot of Asian pro football players out there”), and my dad said that he’s white, but his parents are Japanese.

Someone else probably has a much better idea of who I’m talking about.