Fucking lawyer trying to steal my aunt's estate.

I’m irate. I’m steamed. I am exceedingly upset.

It was only by chance that I managed to stop it too.

I have a very elderly aunt.

Basically, a few weeks ago, my aunt’s solicitor talked her into revoking her existing power of attorney. See here. When asked about it, she said she had not known what she was signing. Cue conversations between ourselves and the solicitor, who had behaved in very underhand fashion. So today I happened to ring her just to say hi and she mentioned that solicitors were there talking about her will. I got my father to hot-foot over there and he challenged them and they left. It wasn’t just her will; it was an enduring power of attorney and a will. The power of attorney being in favour of a mate of theirs and an unknown third party. My father has the document. With a power of attorney, of course, they can loot her estate. We are, of course, looking into what we can do.

How dare you! My aunt deserves better than this. So does your colleague who is my parents’ neighbour. You’re scum, taking advantage of an old lady. Absolute scum.

I’d write more but I’m too angry to express myself.

In your place, I’d definitely be making a complaint to either the state bar association, or the district attorney in your area.
I’m glad your family is involved enough in your aunt’s life that this story didn’t have a horrid ending. A lot of elderly folks who are on their own might not have been so lucky.

Good grief - that’s really horrible. Since your aunt has a “solicitor”, I assume you’re not in the States - but there’s got to be some sort of bar association you could contact. They tend to take these sorts of things very seriously.

Not knowing your jurisdiction, is there any chance you can have the legit PoA upgraded to a full guardianship?

  1. If your father was intended to hold joint power of attorney with the solicitor, have him ask the solicitor what he was doing, who the “unknown mate” was, and why a person unknown to and unrelated to your aunt would be included in the POA.

  2. If the solicitor cannot plausibly address those questions, explain the situation to your aunt and have her fire him and hire another solicitor.

  3. Immediately report this to the government office or association that regulates attorneys in your province, state, or county. (I assume from your mention of “solicitor” that you are not in the States.) Include the document they intended to have your aunt sign.

Quartz, do you mind disclosing where this happening? (east coast, west, midwest?)

Duh! already answered.

Yeah, Quartz is in England.

Lawyers just doin’ what lawyers be doin’! Anybody suprised?

I’ll bet they bill her for the time they spent tryin to rip her off!

This might be a good place to start (assuming you’re not in Scotland, that is.)

I went through this with my wife’s grandmother, but in regards to dirty salesmen.

The simple answer (in our case) was realizing that grandma no longer had the mental faculties, and we took away her ability to sign contracts. We also moved her entire estate into a trust, and she could not write checks for more than $250. All bills got sent to a PO Box and handled by my sister-in-law, and we hired live-in help.

If she can be worked by an attorney, she is open to other bad actors out there.

Sorry.

An attorney in our town got his ass disbarred for taking money from an estate he was executor for. I hope this is followed up on.

However, some lawyers are ethical. My step-mother (she became so long after I was an adult) and step sister dragged by father to a lawyer to get him to change his trust in their favor. The lawyer was suspicious because they would not let my father be alone with the lawyer, and actually called me up to express his concern. My brother and I were able to fly into town, get my father to another one, and get the trust made unchangeable without my permission. This lawyer insisted on talking to my father alone, which we gladly agreed to.

Sometimes the lawyers are more ethical than the relatives.

Honestly? Mildly, yeah. Even putting ethical considerations and the plain ol’ golden rule as it pertains to not ripping off little old ladies aside for a second, somebody that pulls crap like that is pathologically endangering his entire career. It’s like a bank president stealing from the teller’s till. Just head shaking dumb.

Thanks guys, especially Steve. I was rather worked up when I wrote that and forgot to include my location (England) and that you are not my lawyer etc. Action is being taken - my father engaged another solicitor after the last incident - and this will likely result in a formal complaint. That said, it appears that just about everything they’ve done is strictly legal according to the letter of the law. Except she and they never bothered signing in: to me, clear evidence of the attempt to deceive. I’ve also found out the manageress told my father that on a previous visit they told her they were from Social Services; I doubt that will stand up in court.

Update: a formal complaint is being made. It helps that my sister-in-law is a barrister and that the lawyer didn’t follow proper procedure.

This sounds like an example of an all-too-common pattern (even one example of which would, of course, be too common). Sole practitioner (at best partner in tiny firm) has dreams of social status and income beyond what is feasible for what is basically a small one-man business. BIG sense of entitlement. Aston-Martin dreams on a Ford Cortina budget. Decides to get some business deals going with the local real estate agents (usually bottom-feeding property developments) to feed the dreams.

Business deals go belly up. Needs money to cover the bills. Starts by “borrowing” from the trust account and repaying next week. Then next month. Then robs Peter to pay Paul, and realises he can’t keep all those balls in the air and still stay one step ahead of the auditors. Next step is power of attorney fraud, forging mortgages, etc.

Sometimes its gambling that gets the ball rolling - doesn’t matter. Makes me furious. Gives all lawyers a bad name.

Do you have the unexecuted draft PoA? I’d be off to the police in the blink of an eye, but take the advice of your SiL, who is on the scene and knows the details. Usual disclaimer - not legal advice, not my client, but I’d be tempted to drag out the wigs and gowns and get medieval on his ass.

And don’t be too despondent about the “letter of the law” thing. They always try to cover their miserable hides with legalistic bullshit. A common one is some form indicating that the victim agreed to an “investment” when they signed all the paperwork over. The police can do stuff like execute search warrants, find out who this other bloke is, what the business relationship is, what the financial state of the business is, and can often get behind the pseudo-legal veneer.

Hope all goes well.

I’m now steamed again. Its gets worse: they’re now saying it was the care home that contacted them because my father bullied her and they have complained to Age Concern. Funny how she told me and my father and my brother that my aunt had contacted her directly. On seperate calls. Funny how my aunt definitely wanted my father on the PoA.

My father and I may have our issues, but he’d never do something like that.

In the office, when we were working with the Tornado and Typhoon guys, we used to joke about sending airstrikes someone’s way. Or a low-altitude supersonic pass. I’m not sure I’d be joking this time.

And now I’ve been barred from seeing her. :mad: :mad: :mad:

The various stories don’t match up and I’m going to see the manageress tomorrow. I hope I don’t end up calling the police.

I have to say she is likely not to good at details, and that can confuse this even more. People may be hearing completely different things from her, and she doesn’t know the story changes from telling to telling.

Wow, just wow :eek:

Hang in there Quartz and keep your cool. Unleash your sister-in-law to straighten things out. Don’t blow your stack and give them grounds to bar you from seeing your aunt. Good luck.