Is sniper training useful for things other than sniping?

So I’m just curious: let’s say I was to join the USMC, qualify for scout sniper training, finish said training, and practice both spotting and shooting for eighteen to twenty-four months, or however long it took for me to actually be competent. If I then proceed to leave the military, and want to begin a career in something other than SWAT where my training would prove particularly useful, what kind of jobs would I be looking for?

You could become a hunter, or see if you can’t get a job teaching marksmanship/gun safety type things.

Other than that, I imagine there’s numerous things you learn to become a sniper that can be quite useful in other, unrelated trades

Surveyor?

Some of the fieldcraft would be useful in many outdoors situations. Other than that, most of the marksmanship and other skills would be easily transferrable to hunting.

Maybe you could wangle a job with Tom Brown: http://www.trackerschool.com/index.html

My co-worker is former Navy/Army, and passed the Green Beret Q course. He attended Brown’s tracker school, and says that seriously, Brown had them let a mouse loose in a barn (while being visible outside himself), and came back in and recounted the mouses’ actions by reading the tracks in the dust. Apparently the man is a legend in field tracking and survival.

Being a sniper is IMHO secondary to the personal discipline necessary to reach that position. Once that level is achieved, other options previously viewed unobtainable are now within reach.

You could be an awesome eBay bidder.

Bingo. I was only considered a Sharpshooter by the Navy, but had a friend who passed the Marine sniper course. The difference in focus, determination and patience between the two of us was tangible.

We were both later engineers in the civilian world. He used those same personal traits that the Marines drilled into him to devise some truly outstanding designs. He has almost 100 patents today. He is respected for his abilities in my industry, though he refuses to move to the Dark Side (management).

And he kills crows with a pellet gun on his farm. While sitting on the roof of his house. From 50 feet. In a wind.

I would think sniper training would be highly useful for any life calling that involves learning a hard, cold regard for your fellow human beings as crawling inferiors who are expendable on a moments’ notice.

Television Executives?

“Snipers” in the army aren’t just people who’re good shots. For one thing, snipers don’t work alone - they work in teams - and the job is more about stealth and maintaining yourself in the field without external support than it is about being an amazing shot. Being a great shot is a prerequisite, of course, but shooting is 1% of the job.

:smiley:

OK - that made me laugh out loud.