Sir Humphry Davy

I know that Sir Humphry Davy lived in the odium of having discovered sodium, but did he actually detest gravy?

Cordially,

Myron M. Meyer
The Man Who

Sigh… Myron. To plagarize a 16 year old boy. In the woods of Jed Clampett. “Pitiful. Pitiful.”

http://www.u.arizona.edu/~chalmers/misc/clerihews.html

I’ve wasted an inordinate amount of time on the lowest verse form in existence, the Clerihew. Here’s the cream or the dregs, depending on how you look at it.

The first one ever written (1890, by the 16-year-old E. Clerihew Bentley) went like this:

Sir Humphry Davy
Detested gravy.
He lived in the odium
Of having discovered Sodium

I never knew that verse form had a name!

I personally prefer double dactyls myself.

Romanum-schmomanum,
Julius Caesar laid
smack down on Pompey
and conquered old Gaul.
But Junius Brutus did
force in the dagger and
with an “et tu, Brut-
e” ended it all.

Applause may be withheld…

Well, duh. My question was, did he actually detest gravy? You didn’t answer it. Although the link you post does say “pseudo-autobiographical.” I suspect it just rhymes. Anyone have confirmation one way or the other?

I agree (?) with jayjay- the double dactyl, not the noble Clerihew, is the lowest form of doggerel.

Edmund Clerihew Bentley
Evidently
Didn’t care how his verses were timed
As long as they rhymed.

Sir James Dewar
Is better than you are,
For none of you asses
Can liquefy gases.

-Ben

Too bad Sir Humphrey didn’t have a Dewar’s Profile- we could look up the gravy question. (I can perform the reverse operation- does that count?)

Still working on the gravy question. I swear. Proximity of statements does not imply logical relationship.

Dr. Suess
Gave librarians cause to rejoice.
But even Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose
Pronounces it “Suess”.

Last post may be some kind of record: I not only misspelled “Humphry”, but managed to misspell “Seuss” as well! I’m giving up on the gravy question; I have no offline materials with which to pursue it. For others interested in Davy, http://www.geocities.com/bioelectrochemistry/davy.htm seems to be the best biography on the 'net. A glance at Sir Humphry’s portraits, except possibly the one in which he looks like Joe Camel, will prove that the following piece of doggerel is absolute calumny.

There was a young Davy, Sir Humphry
Whom women found much too circumphry.
So he laid off the roux,
And Bechamel, too,
Till his sex life was not so bone-jump free.