Small Victories.

A little while ago, I couldn’t access Operation Clambake.http://xenu.net , to be exact.

I sent a small flurry of communications to my ISP (onewest.net) and I waited.

And waited.

Well, not too long. It’s been sixteen days, to be exact. I suppose that isn’t a huge wait. :smiley:

Just now, I grabbed my mail and, lo and behold, I got a response to one of my polite-yet-firm requests for information:

Eh, topposters. Not my favorite form of Internet fauna, but ya takes what ya gets.

It’s polite, it’s brief, and it’s probably simplified to the point of bogosity (see below for why I think so), but it’s a small victory in my War On Igorance.

Or it is them fixing a minor network hiccup. I’m not really certain on this point.

[hijack]
OK, here’s why I doubt their story: xenu.net buys bandwidth from XS4ALL, a concern in the Netherlands famous for not backing down when the heat’s on. They are unlikely to have dropped connectivity for any reason, from cable-seeking backhoe to bloodthirsty lawyer. xenu.net is directly owned and operated by Andreas Heldal-Lund, a Norweigan activist who is, if anything, less likely than XS4ALL to allow his connection to the Internet to sour. So the two biggest links in the chain, xenu.net’s ISP and xenu.net’s owner, are 99.9% certain to be clear of any wrongdoing.

Further evidence is in the form of the thread: People left and right could access the site when I could not. I could walk down to my local library and access the site. If the problem was closer to xenu.net’s end than it was to mine, neither of those statements would have been true.

So, using the process of elimination at both ends, I have pretty much pointed the blame at onewest.net. And you know what: I don’t really care right now. I have no idea why they would capriciously block a site and then, when confronted with their misdeed, lie and say they didn’t block anything and resume providing service to that site. Had they been confronted with legal bulldogs, they’d have been much more reluctant to allow me, a mere customer, to change their policy (or non-policy, as it seems to have been).

I think my ISP is suffering mental difficulties. I can live with it.

Things are worse on AOL and MSN. :smiley:
[/hijack]

I once got a spammer banned from his ISP. Definitely a small victory in the war against spam, but a very satisfying one.

Very interesting, neuroman. It’s lucky the spammer wasn’t at an ISP that protected his ilk. (Some idiot ISPs do, for reasons ranging from wanting to attract that business to thinking spamming is a free speech issue.) If an ISP won’t kill spammer accounts and/or won’t fix its system so spammers can’t relay through it, frequently the only recourse is to blackhole that ISP until they fix themselves. And that brings up a whole new can of worms.