Two bits of amusement from college students' essays

This is not one of my threads concerning a collection of “gems” gathered from college placement test essays—I will have another one of those ready for you soon. This is just to share a couple of things we found quite hilarious this morning during our assessment session.

#1: a student wrote about something that had happened back in “midol school.”
(Our facilitator wondered aloud if that kind of school is attended just once a month…)

#2: Hilary Cliton.
There are typos, and then there are typos.
:smiley:

Okay, misspellings—it was handwritten.

The point still stands, though.

How many periods are there in a day of midol school?

I’m not sure, but I think the curriculum there causes bloat and a weepy feeling.

School colors should be pretty obvious, I would think.

** School Song**
*I will fight fight fight
for the old red and white
And the gorgeous clotty broooooown!

About ever four weeks
our school spirit leaps
while we scarf all the chocolate down!

Midol school, O Midol school,
we pledge our faith to thee
Midol school O Midol school,
Shut up and bring us Herbal Teaaaaaaa!
*

Bravo, Tristan!

Some of my coworkers and I are reading applications for a program. One of them had an essay about an applicant’s experience volunteering at a State School for the Dead. I can only imagine the mascot.

That song is far, far better than any other school song I have ever heard.

What, may I ask, did they mean to say instead of School for the Dead?

I’m assuming it was School of the Deaf.

My guess: School for the Deaf.

braaaiiins…Braaaaaiiins…BRAAAAIINS!

I tossed a resume for an editor applying for a copy editor position right after I read the first line in the cover letter, “I am detailed oriented…”

Not so much.

Strange … this is the fist time in my life I’ve ever thout about what amusement might be gained from my alma mater … High School.

No idea about the college.

Bump rather than make a new thread. I found this amusing redundancy today, and it’s one that actually makes the rounds in journalism too:

“an arsenal of weapons”