What could this song be about?

In this thread about how English sounds to speakers of other languages, this clip was referred to. Granted that it’s gibberish, what do you think this song could be about? What kind of lyrics would fit the production?

I’m trying to peg the aesthetics, and I’m close to concluding that if it weren’t in fact gibberish, it probably would be close to it all the same. Maybe a superficial anthem, or an empty narrative. Clearly not a ballad. Nor is it a rally cry; there’s no dominating chorus. An ode? Hardly; the imagery of the set design rules that out.

Any suggestions?

There was a reference to a YouTube clip which I followed up.

The interesting bit is the speech pattern, where Italian speech seems like a continuous stream with rather a lot of words, and not all that efficient in getting information across quickly, so that lots of gestures and non-verbal tricks need to be used.

The pseudo English does seem a little bit pedestrian, but it leaves a whole lot more room within it.

The song itself reminded me of this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sM_9As_2VAg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15KL9f38sJ0

In this thread I transcribed the lyrics to this song, so you don’t have to wonder anymore.

I heard it as similar to Mambo No. 5, at least in musical style.

I found this months ago and when the first few times I heard it, I thought it was remarkable how much it sounded like English gibberish. But now when I listen to it, I can’t help but think it sounds like German.

Anyway, to the OP, I’m sure you’ve already read cuauhtemoc’s lyrics. The lyrics aren’t literal of course, but they never are. I mean, nobody ever really left a cake out in the rain.

I think the song is about sex. Possibly between two animals, but that may just be referring to the animal lust occurring between a man and a woman who met on a train, or maybe in a homeless shelter. And there are circus performers involved. Or maybe a trapeze. Or maybe a Volkswagen filled with clowns.

Or maybe not. I’m no expert on lyrical analysis.

Ah, thanks. That’s what I thought he was saying, but I just wanted to be sure.

What I want to know, is why have I subjected myself to that video like 20 times in the last two days? Make it stop.

My OCD led me to YouTube, where it became apparent that Adriano Celentano recorded the song once in the 70s and has been lip-syncing ever since.