What is the origin of 'Hump Day'?

I posted a thread in 2001 [added link in quote]:

One person who replied said he’d heard ‘Hump Day’ around 1983 in Southern Ontario. Another poster said she’d heard it in 1984 in Texas. By the time of KMET’s demise in 1987, I was within range of KROQ, and switched to music that fitted my tastes better.

When and where was ‘Hump Day’/‘Humpday’ first used, and by whom?

Definitely earlier than the 1980s. Google Books is an awkward place to search, since it often dates periodicals by the first issue in their records, but a few hits seem to be solid.

The hard hat girl, power engineer: a novel - Page 84
books.google.com/books?id=eHZbAAAAMAAJ
McCulloch Byers - 1976 - Snippet view
Well, with less than a half hour left now, it looked as though she might pull through her third day in fairly good shape. The third time’s a charm, they say; and today must be the normal, “routine”, office day, — Wednesday, — “hump day” — over …

California: The New Society - Page 2
books.google.com/books?id=JwsVAAAAYAAJ
Remi A. Nadeau - 1974 - Snippet view - More editions
In the average California office, Wednesday is “hump day”— you’re over the hump. By Friday, you’re mentally already on the weekend. Friday night the going-home traffic is clogged not only with commuters, but with house trailers, campers, …

Texas Monthly - Jun 1974 - Page 117
books.google.com/books?id=ACoEAAAAMBAJ
Vol. 2, No. 6 - Magazine - Full view
Weekdays: 11:30-2, 5:30-11. :30. Weekends: 5:30-midnight. Moderate. Jaxon’s, 508 N. Stanton (532-0950). Homemade soups, salads and sandwiches. An afterwork “in” spot, the court is packed for Over the Hump Day (Wed) and T.G.I.F. Bar.

Current Slang - Volumes 2-5
books.google.com/books?id=SWVXAAAAYAAJ
1967 - Snippet view - More editions
The middle of the week, “hump day.” 1, 3. , v. To act (command to get busy) . Humus , adj. Admirable or beautiful, “tough” or “cool.” Hurt , adj. Of limited sophistication (applied by those of limited sophistication. —I, 1. . . The remainder of the …

Proceedings, Annual Great Lakes Park Institute - Issue 21 - Page 85
books.google.com/books?id=lPbiAAAAMAAJ
1967 - Snippet view - More editions
This is Thursday; over- the -hump day in your Institute. You have had three busy days and evenings. You are now reaching the time when you do not wish to listen to a long dissertation on the history of the preservation movement - - it goes …

An introduction to school administration: selected readings - Page 30
books.google.com/books?id=0n47AAAAIAAJ
Mervin Chester Nolte - 1966 - Snippet view - More editions
THE SON OF A MEMBER OF THE SCHOOL BOARD Terrel Howard Bell One morning, after the third week of school had passed the mark that the teachers called “hump day,” or Wednesday, a very small boy came to school. He registered in …

California: the new society - Page 2
books.google.com/books?id=uJEGAQAAIAAJ
Remi A. Nadeau - 1963 - Snippet view - More editions
In the average California office, Wednesday is “hump day”— you’re over the hump. By Friday, you’re mentally already on the weekend. Friday night the going-home traffic is clogged not only with commuters, but with house trailers, campers, …

As you can see, California: the new society went through multiple editions, so somebody would need to check the actual book to see whether it had the usage from the beginning.

I’ve heard (and used) the expression as early as the late 70s. Not as early as Exapno Mapcase’s cites, though.

In the early 1970s it was a common meme.

Ask my old girlfriend what happened almost every Wednesday.

It’s certainly been around for a while in Australia in common usage.

When I joined the workforce in the mid 80’s Hump day for Wednesday and POETS day for Friday were common vernacular.

This is the earliest I could find.

I had to look it up, but for anyone else confused, “POETS” means “piss off early, tomorrow’s Saturday.”

Hump NIght–1955. In American Speech.

I personally first heard it in the late 1970s.

Alternatively, “Piss on everything, tomorrow’s Saturday.”

Interesting that most of early examples use “over the hump” with the phrase being shortened as it passed into common usage.

Hump is a very old word, but it apparently started taking on this sort of metaphorical usage early in the 20th century.

And, “Piss off everyone, tomorrow’s Saturday.”

And everyday can be FISH Day … “Fuck it. Shit Happens.”

That’s the one I know it as.:wink:

I haven’t heard POETS in ages. I remember it from when TGIF was popular.

For some reason, it reminds me of when I worked at an Air Force base and saw FIGMO. ‘F— it. Got my orders.’

The eagle flies on Friday
Saturday, I go out and play!

That’s what I’m familiar with as well.

For Thursday there’s SHIT - “Sorry Honey, it’s Thursday”

I thought the expresion was “The eagle shits on Friday”.

The Allman Brothers, Long John Baldry, Eric Clapton, Cream, Etta James, Ian Anderson, Albert King, BB King, John Mayall, Mountain, and T-Bone Walker among others all disagree with you.