Peacekeeper Joe

All right, so I was walking through the local dollar store yesterday in order to find some kind cheap necklace. What can I say, I was in a jewelry mood.

Anyway, the dollar store is rather disorganized. There are earrings next to disinfectant next to the toys. It therefore follows that I had to walk through the toy section in order to see if there were any necklaces. As I walked past the rows of different toys, I saw a most. . .interesting sight:

A “peacekeeper” doll. Dressed in attire that any sane person would describe as military garb. I believe there was even a plastic gun included. Ten years ago, this would have been called a “soldier” doll, a discount rate G.I. Joe.

For some reason, this pissed me off. I’m not sure why.

Maybe because I find the notion of a “peacekeeper” with a gun to be a complete oxymoron.

Maybe because I come from a family where I had two grandparents serving in WW2 and a father who saw the worst of Vietnam.

Maybe because I’m sick of ridiculous “fuzzifiy-ing” of military matters.

Jesus Christ. My father was a soldier. Soldiers have protected this country, and others. They wore fatigues, and carried guns.

CALL THE FUCKING DOLL A SOLDIER!

I mean, what the hell do you think the kids are going to do? “Hey, Dakota, I’m going to be PEACEKEEPER Joe. You can be PEACEKEEPER Bob. Let’s pretend we’re on a mission to Felchdonia, where we pretty much just walk around enforcing random peacekeeping things that we know NOTHING about because we are 7 year-olds whose parents bought us third-rate action figures at a cheap-ass dollar store.”

No, they aren’t going to do that. They are going to embark on a “blow up stuff” mission, a “fighting” mission, an “infiltration” mission. Why the HELL would we call that peacekeeping? Why don’t we just call that doll a “soldier”?

What is that? “Soldier” is a dirty word? So is “G.I.”?

Screw that. SCREW that. As I said before: my father was a soldier. A G.I. Sergeant or something-or-other in the army. Got some pretty good medals. And as much as I dislike that guy, I see what he did as pretty much his duty. I don’t think the Vietnam war was a good idea, but villifying soldiers because of that–horrible.

I’ve heard enough about the crap my dad had to deal with when he got home.

I’m sick of seeing war portrayed as peacekeeping.

This pisses me off.

And I never did find any necklaces. :mad:

Well, except sometimes soldiers are sent to do peacekeeping, and are not actually sent to “war”.

I know a number of soldiers that peacekeeping tours in Cyprus - there wasn’t a war going on, there was just some people that didn’t particularly get along.

I think you may be overreacting.

Crappy about the necklaces though - the consignment store that I work part time just got a bunch of really cools ones in and I scored a really great green one that matches tonnes of my stuff. Too bad you aren’t in Calgary - however, if you go over to the MPSIMS jewelry swap and put in your info, I could probably send you one! (We have pink!)

Al.

UN peacekeepers routinely carry weapons and ride in armoured vehicles. In a hostile country, it is hard to keep peace by asking people to hold hands and sing songs. The peacekeepers carry weaponry so that they can defend themselves if they are attacked and show that they are armed, stopping some attacks. An element of peacekeeping is eliminating enemies of the populous.

http://userpages.aug.com/captbarb/degroot.html there is a picture of a Norwegian woman in an Armoured Personnel Carrier.

It’s really hard to find more pictures, if I come across some I will post them.

And that does suck about the jewelry!

I know that there are peacekeepers, but most of the time, when kids play with these things…they’re not playing at peacekeeping.

Plus I think the name sounds stupid. But that’s just me.

Angel

You saw this toy at the dollar store. You know why you saw it there? Because no retail store wanted it.

File this under “You see some strange things at the dollar store”, not “Ways military matters have been fuzzified”.

I am very proud of the peacekeeping tradition of Canada’s military.